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Is haemosiderin always haemoglobin derived?

by sameeralord
Tags: derived, haemoglobin, haemosiderin
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sameeralord
#1
Jan4-13, 08:52 AM
P: 640
Hello everyone,

Haemosiderin definition says that it is a pigment that occurs when there is a local or systemic excess of iron. Does that mean excess iron deposition can cause haemosiderin pigment, I mean you don't alway need macrophages to eat Hb and make it, just iron is enough. Thanks
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Ryan_m_b
#2
Jan4-13, 06:13 PM
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Just to clarify are you asking if excess iron is the cause of haemosiderin synthesis? I don't find your post clear to understand.


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