Register to reply

Transformation of a Vector

by Septim
Tags: transformation, vector
Share this thread:
Septim
#1
Feb2-13, 08:31 AM
P: 121
Greetings,

My question is from the book "Tensor Analysis" by Barry Spain. I am asked to show that how a vector transforms from rectangular Cartesian coordinates to polar coordinates. I have attached the question in jpeg format. I have came up with a solution but the angular component in my solution is r^2 times the angular component given in the book. I have checked some books about this subject and found out that both the solution given in the attachment and I have found exist. I am pretty confused about this and I assume that this book is wrong. I will be grateful if someone can provide some insight.
Attached Thumbnails
ss.JPG  
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Guidelines for enhancing solar cells using surface plasmon polaritons
Trees and shrubs invading critical grasslands, diminish cattle production
Climate change will threaten fish by drying out Southwest US streams, research predicts
Septim
#2
Feb3-13, 08:59 AM
P: 121
Any ideas ?
mathman
#3
Feb3-13, 03:09 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 6,056
My guess: normalization question. Both answers may be right.

Ferramentarius
#4
Feb4-13, 05:18 PM
P: 22
Transformation of a Vector

Here is a solution based on using vector u_r = [cos(A) , sin(A)] and vector u_A = [-sin(A), cos(A)] normal to it. Edit: It appears the answer is not exactly the same.
Septim
#5
May8-13, 04:03 AM
P: 121
Quote Quote by Ferramentarius View Post
Here is a solution based on using vector u_r = [cos(A) , sin(A)] and vector u_A = [-sin(A), cos(A)] normal to it. Edit: It appears the answer is not exactly the same.
I just saw your post much later but I did not understand your argument.

P.S The link is not accessible.
Septim
#6
Jun12-13, 06:56 PM
P: 121
The link was accessible and I saw the solution which is similar to mine though less detail is provided. The two answers differ by a factor of r and I think the solution in the link you suggest is the correct one, since it has the dimensions of acceleration and this is acceleration am I correct?


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Dual vector transformation Calculus & Beyond Homework 1
Vector coordinate transformation: Help? Advanced Physics Homework 4
Active transformation of a vector Advanced Physics Homework 0
Vector transformation Linear & Abstract Algebra 3
Vector Transformation Linear & Abstract Algebra 1