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Measurement of voltage and current

by Young Learner
Tags: current, measurement, voltage
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Young Learner
#1
Apr7-14, 11:30 PM
P: 41
Is there a way in electrical engineering where I can convert
230 KV to 5 V such that the 5 V wave has same amplitude, phase and frequency as that of 230 KV.
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2milehi
#2
Apr7-14, 11:42 PM
P: 111
That is very high voltage - don't even think of getting within 30 feet of that high of voltage.
mr_pavlo
#3
Apr8-14, 12:43 AM
P: 13
If it had the same amplitude it wouldn't be 5V but 230kV.

meBigGuy
#4
Apr8-14, 02:00 AM
P: 1,084
Measurement of voltage and current

I assume by "same amplitude" you mean that any amplitude variation in the 230KV would show up in the 5V. For example, maybe you want to build a regulated tesla coil so you use a pickup loop to monitor the high voltage and keep it constant.

Anyway, down conversion of 230Kv AC is done by transformers. Huge power stations convert 230KV power lines to usable voltages. A pickup coil near a transmission line could produce 5V.

Can you be more specific regarding what you are trying to do?
Young Learner
#5
Apr8-14, 04:46 AM
P: 41
Quote Quote by meBigGuy View Post
I assume by "same amplitude" you mean that any amplitude variation in the 230KV would show up in the 5V. For example, maybe you want to build a regulated tesla coil so you use a pickup loop to monitor the high voltage and keep it constant.

Anyway, down conversion of 230Kv AC is done by transformers. Huge power stations convert 230KV power lines to usable voltages. A pickup coil near a transmission line could produce 5V.

Can you be more specific regarding what you are trying to do?
I was trying to make a paper on synchronizing alternators. If I can monitor the amplitude phase and frequency of two generators, then I thought that I could synchronize them using a differential amplifier or a simple logic gate.
For amplifiers and gate to work I wanted a low voltage waveform which is analogues to high voltage of the transformers.
All I wanted was a low voltage waveform which changes simultaneously according to the high voltage waveform so that I can use it for synchronizing purposes.
Young Learner
#6
Apr8-14, 04:48 AM
P: 41
Quote Quote by mr_pavlo View Post
If it had the same amplitude it wouldn't be 5V but 230kV.
Ah! that shows my ignorance.
I meant the low voltage wave must vary in accordance with the high voltage wave.
The Electrician
#7
Apr8-14, 10:45 AM
P: 778
You would use a potential transformer:

http://www.electricityforum.com/prod...ransformer.htm
Young Learner
#8
Apr8-14, 10:59 AM
P: 41
Quote Quote by The Electrician View Post
You would use a potential transformer:

http://www.electricityforum.com/prod...ransformer.htm
Aren't potential transformer extremely costly.
And will they be able to step down 230 KV to a mere 5 V.
psparky
#9
Apr8-14, 11:20 AM
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P: 766
Everytime you plug your phone into the wall you get 5 volts into your phone.........that was once 230KV running down the powerlines. Only difference is they convert to DC....so just skip the rectifier in the last transformer.

So yes, very possible to convert since done all day, every day. (assuming different amplitude, obviously)

Multiple tranformers at specific points will do the trick.
Young Learner
#10
Apr8-14, 11:25 AM
P: 41
Quote Quote by psparky View Post
Everytime you plug your phone into the wall you get 5 volts into your phone.........that was once 230KV running down the powerlines. Only difference is they convert to DC....so just skip the rectifier in the last transformer.

So yes, very possible to convert since done all day, every day. (assuming different amplitude, obviously)

Multiple tranformers at specific points will do the trick.
That is fine. But the thing which worries me is the cost.
Approximately how much will it cost to step down 230 KV to 5 V.
jim hardy
#11
Apr8-14, 11:38 AM
Sci Advisor
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P: 3,758
Approximately how much will it cost to step down 230 KV to 5 V
a sizeable chunk of a million bucks.

have you searched on "automatic synchronizer"?

https://www.basler.com/Products/Sync...-Synchronizer/
psparky
#12
Apr8-14, 12:13 PM
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P: 766
Quote Quote by jim hardy View Post
a sizeable chunk of a million bucks.

have you searched on "automatic synchronizer"?

https://www.basler.com/Products/Sync...-Synchronizer/
I was gonna say a hell of a lot! Anytime you get near high voltage.......super high price.

It takes a boat load of certifications for it even to be legal to go anywhere near 230KV.


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