Register to reply

Simple question regarding polynomials

by slevvio
Tags: polynomials, simple
Share this thread:
slevvio
#1
Oct30-11, 07:37 AM
P: 8
Hello all I had a simple question that I am intuitively sure I know the answer to but can't quite prove it.

Suppose k is a polynomial in x and y, and k(x-1) = q for q some polynomial in y. Then is k = 0 ?

How do I verify that k must be equal to 0? I can see that to just get a polynomial in y we have to try to get rid of that x term, but I can't quite prove why we cant just make some polynomial that gets rid of it somehow.

any help would be appreciated, thanks
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Security CTO to detail Android Fake ID flaw at Black Hat
Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean
Mysterious molecules in space
gb7nash
#2
Oct30-11, 07:45 AM
HW Helper
P: 805
Suppose k != 0, so q = ...
elegysix
#3
Oct30-11, 09:56 AM
P: 314
If k=0, then k(x-1)=q=0.

If you let a polynomial in y be P(y) then if k=P(y)/(x-1), q=P(y)....


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Proof that the legendre polynomials are orthogonal polynomials Calculus 3
Question on Chebyshev polynomials? Calculus & Beyond Homework 0
Physics question with polynomials Precalculus Mathematics Homework 3
Simple question on polynomials Precalculus Mathematics Homework 5
Question regarding polynomials Introductory Physics Homework 2