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Hamiltonian formulation of QCD and nucleon mass

by tom.stoer
Tags: formulation, hamiltonian, mass, nucleon
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tom.stoer
#1
Mar14-14, 04:18 AM
Sci Advisor
P: 5,464
Hello,

there are several papers on QCD in Hamiltonian formulation, especially in Coulomb gauge. Unfortunately the Hamiltonian H is rather formel and highly complex.

Question: is there a paper discussing the contribution of individual terms of H to the nucleon mass?
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Einj
#2
Mar15-14, 09:08 AM
P: 328
The question about nucleon masses is rather complicated by itself, especially because it is a non-perturbative problem. I don't know if there is any simple way to related any term in the QCD Hamiltonian to the nucleon mass. I would say that the most relevant terms are the quark-gluon interaction and the gluon-gluon-gluon or gluon-gluon-gluon-gluon interactions. This is because the nucleon (or in general hadron) masses are mainly given by binding energy rather then the actual quark masses.

However, if you want a more phenomenological way of deriving (with a pretty good accuracy) the mass of the hadrons you can take a look at the "Constituent quark and spin-spin interaction" model. I think that the original reference should be:

http://journals.aps.org/prd/abstract...hysRevD.12.147

However, there is a pretty good explanation of that in:

http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-ph/0412098v2.pdf

In section II.

I hope this is useful.
tom.stoer
#3
Mar15-14, 01:03 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 5,464
Quote Quote by Einj View Post
The question about nucleon masses is rather complicated by itself, especially because it is a non-perturbative problem. I don't know if there is any simple way to related any term in the QCD Hamiltonian to the nucleon mass. I would say that the most relevant terms are the quark-gluon interaction and the gluon-gluon-gluon or gluon-gluon-gluon-gluon interactions. This is because the nucleon (or in general hadron) masses are mainly given by binding energy rather then the actual quark masses.
Yes, I know.

What I am looking for us an analysis like

http://arxiv-web3.library.cornell.ed...310.1797v1.pdf

for the nucleon mass.


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