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1.95e7 conversion

  1. Nov 4, 2004 #1
    Can someone help? It may seem elementary, but I have an application identifying a radius of 1.95e7m. What does the 1.95e7m convert to?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 4, 2004 #2

    Doc Al

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    exponential notation

    1.95e7 means [itex]1.95 \times 10^7[/itex]. (And m = meters.)
     
  4. Nov 4, 2004 #3
    1.95e7 is the same as 1.95x10^7?
     
  5. Nov 4, 2004 #4

    Integral

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    Yes, they are the same.
     
  6. Nov 4, 2004 #5
    hey guys but isn't "e" and "E" different. for example e1 = 2.718 and E1 = 10. if you want it to be the same as 1.95x10^7 then i suggest you use a capital E so as not to confuse.
     
  7. Nov 4, 2004 #6

    Doc Al

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    I've never seen it used that way. I've always seen 1.95e7 = 1.95E7 = [itex]1.95 \times 10^7[/itex]. In this context, I believe that e or E just stands for "exponent". (Personally, I always use E. :smile: )
     
  8. Nov 5, 2004 #7
    Generally something in the form of [itex]A.BCeX[/itex], where X is an integer, is considered to be [itex]A.BC\times{10^{X}}[/itex], although this is not a definite rule. It is better to write it in the latter form to avoid confusion.
     
  9. Nov 6, 2004 #8

    BobG

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    It's a calculator based tradition. Calculator's, especially your early LED's, weren't very good at displaying scientific notation the way you do on paper. It's displayed 1.95e7 or 1.95E7 on a spread sheet, as well, for the same reason.
     
  10. Nov 6, 2004 #9

    cepheid

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    As DocAl, Integral, Sirus, and BobG pointed out, whenever [itex] \text{e\ \or\ \E} [/itex] appear in this context (on a calculator or computer) it refers to a power of ten. It should not be confused with [itex] e [/itex], Euler's number, the irrational constant. Just thought I'd clarify that.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2004 #10
    ok i understand what you guys are saying, i just made the point because on my calculator the two of them are two different e's. the exponent is "E" and the constant is "e".
     
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