6 Dec 2016 M 6.5 Quake northern Sumatera, Indonesia

  • Thread starter davenn
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In summary, the earthquake in Sumatera, Indonesia on December 6th, 2016 was caused by a rupture along the Sumatra Fault. It had a magnitude of 6.5 on the Richter scale, indicating a strong earthquake that can cause moderate to significant damage. While there were reports of damage to buildings and infrastructure, there were no reported casualties. Aftershocks are also a risk following a significant earthquake, and scientists use instruments such as seismometers to measure and track earthquakes.
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davenn
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My live gram ...

http://www.sydneystormcity.com/seismograms.htm

saved file ...

zhi.gif
This quake on just offshore ESE of Banda Aceh city
it has been severely damaging and last report I heard around 19 fatalities

M6.5 - 19km SE of Sigli, Indonesia
2016-12-06 22:03:32 UTC 5.281°N 96.108°E 8.2 km depth
cheers
Dave
 
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  • #2
davenn said:
19 fatalities
Now at 54. --- Fox
 
  • #3
Bystander said:
Now at 54. --- Fox
:frown::frown:
 

Related to 6 Dec 2016 M 6.5 Quake northern Sumatera, Indonesia

1. What caused the earthquake in Sumatera, Indonesia on December 6th, 2016?

The earthquake on December 6th, 2016 in Sumatera, Indonesia was caused by a rupture along the Sumatra Fault. This fault is a major strike-slip fault that runs along the western coast of Sumatra and is known for producing large earthquakes.

2. How strong was the earthquake?

The earthquake was measured at a magnitude of 6.5 on the Richter scale. This indicates a strong earthquake that can cause moderate to significant damage to structures.

3. Was there any damage or casualties from the earthquake?

Yes, there were reports of damage to buildings and infrastructure in the affected area. However, there were no reported casualties from this earthquake.

4. Is there a risk of aftershocks following the earthquake?

Yes, there is always a risk of aftershocks following a significant earthquake. In the days and weeks following the earthquake in Sumatera, there were several aftershocks recorded in the region.

5. How do scientists measure and track earthquakes?

Scientists use a variety of instruments, including seismometers, to measure and track earthquakes. These instruments record the seismic waves produced by an earthquake and allow scientists to determine the magnitude, location, and depth of the earthquake.

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