A question about first year Mathematics

In summary, it depends on the strand. Some schools only have one strand but a lot have a standard Calc I and II strand and then others do an honours version of this. The main difference is that you will be exposed more so to more advanced topics like the proofs of the various identities and so forth and the level of abstraction will possibly be higher. It's kind of like the difference between studying generalizing geometry with manifolds as compared to studying geometry in Euclidean (note Cartesian) space.
  • #1
flyingpig
2,579
1
Is first year math in an university just Calculus I, II (or AP Calculus BC), and III?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
flyingpig said:
Is first year math in an university just Calculus I, II (or AP Calculus BC), and III?

It depends on the strand. Some schools only have one strand but a lot have a standard Calc I and II strand and then others do an honours version of this.

The main difference is that you will be exposed more so to more advanced topics like the proofs of the various identities and so forth and the level of abstraction will possibly be higher. It's kind of like the difference between studying generalizing geometry with manifolds as compared to studying geometry in Euclidean (note Cartesian) space.

You could look at Harvard Maths department and that should give you a rough idea of some differences that could be encountered. Also note that they have one of the hardest undergrad courses in math which is the Math 55.

Calc I and II is usually assumes that you've done on limits and calculus because it goes at a decent speed and you will have to do your work to keep up. You'll touch things like some basic differential equations as well as series sequences and other things. The lower levels is about getting used to doing simple calc problems so that you can use that to build on doing harder problems when you learn more advanced techniques with differential equations and other advancements in calculus.

Calc III builds on geometry aspects that you study in first year. It can be done in the first year when its taught as an multivariable calculus course but it expects that people have already done into calc and have gotten good results.

Also you will learn basic linear algebra.

Most of what you learn in the early days of math is simply a lot of techniques. Its kind of like building a collection of tools to tackle problems. Although there are stark differences between honors and normal, if you're going to do more applied math the tools that you use (as long you understand them) should really suffice.

Good luck with uni when you get there
 
  • #3
So it is not...?
 

Related to A question about first year Mathematics

1. What is first year Mathematics?

First year Mathematics is a broad term that refers to the introductory level of mathematics courses taken in the first year of university or college. These courses typically cover topics such as algebra, calculus, geometry, and statistics.

2. What are the benefits of studying first year Mathematics?

Studying first year Mathematics can provide a strong foundation for future studies in math and other related fields, such as engineering, physics, and economics. It also helps with critical thinking skills, problem-solving abilities, and logical reasoning.

3. Is first year Mathematics difficult?

The difficulty of first year Mathematics can vary depending on the individual and their level of understanding and interest in the subject. However, with dedication and consistent practice, it is achievable for most students.

4. What are some common challenges students face in first year Mathematics?

Some common challenges students may face in first year Mathematics include struggling with new concepts, difficulty with abstract thinking, and time management. It is important to communicate with professors and seek help when needed to overcome these challenges.

5. How can I prepare for first year Mathematics?

To prepare for first year Mathematics, it is recommended to review basic math concepts, such as algebra and geometry, as well as practice critical thinking and problem-solving skills. You can also familiarize yourself with the course material and reach out to professors or tutors for additional resources and support.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
22
Views
4K
  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
37
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
3K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
16
Views
974
Replies
13
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
703
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top