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Quantum Advanced quantum mechanics book - toward QFT

  1. Sep 2, 2015 #1
    Hello everyone!
    I just finished studying basic quantum mechanics, using Liboff's "Introductory Quantum Mechanics", i.e. wavefunctions, uncertainty relations, basic 1D problems, dirac notation, angular momentum (orbital and spin, addition, eigenfunctions, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients etc), problems in 3D (free particle in spherical, hydrogen atom), matrix mechanics, Heisenberg Picture, time independent perturbation theory, WKB approximation, harmonic oscillator using annihilation and creation operators, plus the mathematics for those (some operator theory and the special functions (legendre, laguerre polynomials, bessel, spherical harmonics etc)).
    My goal is to study QFT and I suppose I first need some advanced graduate level quantum mechanics. What book should I use? Maybe Schiff or Merzbacher? Sakurai's Advanced Quantum mechanics?
    Any other recommendation regarding my goal towards QFT? I bought also Feynman's book "path integral and quantum mechanics".

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 2, 2015 #2

    Orodruin

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    Yes, you will benefit from reading a more advanced quantum mechanics text before delving into quantum field theory. I would also like to point out one thing which might not be very obvious: You also need to study special relativity to some extent. The reason for this is that QFT to a large extent deals with relativistic field theories and you will therefore benefit greatly from having taken at least an intermediate level course on special relativity which goes beyond the introductory level of "this is special relativity, time is relative, length contracts, etc etc" and reaches the discussion on 4-vectors and invariant quantities.
     
  4. Sep 2, 2015 #3
    Thanks for your reply!
    I forgot to mention that! I have taken already a course in special relativity, where we used rindler's book. Do I need more? I am familiar with 4 vectors and the electromagnetic field tensor. Should I study GR first also?
     
  5. Sep 2, 2015 #4

    Orodruin

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    With a level of SR equivalent to that you would have after understanding Rindler you should be fine in terms of the relativity prerequisites. You do not need to study GR to start learning QFT.
     
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