Aeroplane wing structure -- airflow question

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Why the air splitted at point a of aeroplane wing's cross section meet at point b simulatneously,
 

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russ_watters

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Why the air splitted at point a of aeroplane wing's cross section meet at point b simulatneously,
The air does not meet at point b simultaneously - in fact the air above the wing gets there first. Does your text explicitly say something about this?
 

A.T.

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Why the air splitted at point a of aeroplane wing's cross section meet at point b simulatneously,
It doesn't. See 25sec into this video:

 
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Why the air splitted at point a of aeroplane wing's cross section meet at point b simulatneously,
sir see the text from which I am reading,
They have written the same thing.
 

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berkeman

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sir see the text from which I am reading,
They have written the same thing.
Can you provide a link to that text, or at least the title and author and edition? Thanks. :smile:
 
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Can you provide a link to that text, or at least the title and author and edition? Thanks. :smile:
Sir I got this text from my coaching institute.
 

berkeman

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Sir I got this text from my coaching institute.
Well, since it is suspect at this point, it would be good to get more information about it so we can figure out if the person putting it together doesn't understand the subject really well, or if perhaps there is some other issue with your/our understanding of what they wrote.

Perhaps you could forward a link to this PF thread to your "coaching institute" to see if they have a response? Thanks.
 
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Can anyone explain me why the speed of air splitted on top has more speed.
 
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FactChecker

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You will see many intuitively simple explanations of lift. They are all wrong or at least incomplete. The real explanation of the lift force is unsatisfyingly complicated.

If small packets of air are traced along so that they satisfy all the physics equations (a very complicated process of computational fluid dynamics (CFD)), they end up with a net downward motion after the wing has passed. They also travel faster over the top and reach the trailing edge sooner than the packets beneath the wing. The net downward motion of the air is an action for which the equal and opposite reaction is a lift force on the wing.

Here is a Youtube video, referencing the Coanda Effect, that might interest you.

PS. The motion of the air also exerts a nose-down rotational moment on the wing.
 
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berkeman

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Thanks to all 😊
 

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