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Aerospace Engineering Reading Material for a Newbie

  1. Mar 28, 2013 #1
    In the future I would really like to enroll in an aerospace engineering course and I was wondering if there are any good books out there which cover the important parts of this discipline?

    I came across the following page which contains some of the topics that will be taught in university (at least at this particular one) http://www.herts.ac.uk/courses/Aerospace-Engineering-BEng_structure.cfm
    Are there books which cover the whole range? I don't need them to go into full detail.

    I'd like to buy a maximum of 3 books so advice is welcome.

    There also seems to be a lot of new online courses as well as lecture videos, so are there any good aerospace ones available?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 3, 2013 #2
  4. Apr 4, 2013 #3

    jhae2.718

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    Anderson's Introduction to Flight is a common text used for introductory aerospace engineering courses, and give a brief overview of the major disciplines.
     
  5. Apr 5, 2013 #4
    Thanks for letting me know about this book, a lot of people give it good reviews. I'll definitely be buying this.
     
  6. May 12, 2013 #5
    Fundamentals of Aerodynamics - Anderson
    Elements of Propulsion; Gas Turbines and Rockets - Mattingly
    Aircraft Engine Design - Mattingly, Heiser, Pratt
    Aircraft Performance and Design - Anderson
    Aircraft Structures for Engineering Students - Megson
     
  7. May 12, 2013 #6

    Danger

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    This might sound a little odd. I'm writing from the perspective of a (now grounded) pilot with no formal education. Reading a lot of "Private Pilot", "Plane and Pilot" or similar magazines might help because it will give you a user's-eye view of how things work. If you can afford it, even take a couple of introductory flight lessons. That's how I started: $5.00 and a coupon from the magazine got me my first half hour lesson.
    Learning to fly involves a lot of the details of what keeps an iron bird in the air.
     
  8. May 13, 2013 #7

    jhae2.718

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    "Stick goes forward, houses get bigger. Stick goes back, houses get smaller."?
     
  9. May 13, 2013 #8

    Danger

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    Well it's actually more of "stick controls speed; throttle controls altitude".
    Unless back with the Sopwiths, when it was "pull the stick back to go up; pull it back some more to come down."
     
  10. May 16, 2013 #9
    I've always wanted to know, what tastes better: Brontosaurus flank steak or Woolly Mammoth baby back ribs?
     
  11. May 24, 2013 #10

    Danger

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    The flank steak, for sure; tastes like chicken. On the other hand, the ribs come with built-in dental floss.
     
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