Americans Eating Selves To Death

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  • #26
Zero
There is absolutely too much sugar in everything...you can lose 15-20 pounds in a year, with no major sacrifice, if you eliminate refined sugar from your diet, and avoid eating anything with added sugar. The third listed ingredient in spaghetti sauce is CORN SYRUP! 8 ounces of spaghetti sauce as nearly as much sugar as 8 ounces of Pepsi!
 
  • #27
Sugar is not the only problem. In fact, we need large amounts of carbohydrates to function properly (sugar=brain energy).

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art7475.asp
Your reaction is highly dependent on your level of physical activity. If you're a couch potato who's daily activity consists of surfing the net, watching t.v. and taking trips to the fridge then you'll only experience slight discomfort. If you have a physical job (u.p.s. workers, construction workers, massage therapists, etc.), exercise on a regular basis, or play sports, be prepared to experience an energy drain and brain fog like you've never experienced before. Even though Atkins forces your body to use fat for energy, your body's prefered source of energy is carbs which means your body is not running on optimum fuel. Once you get past induction you will still be eating hardly any carbs; 25g, 30g, and so on. Do you think you can handle that? You will eventually be able to eat more of the foods you love but how much carb deprivation will you have to endure until you reach your goal weight?
It is good advice to eat lower amounts of refined sugar, but there are other serious dietary problems that lead to health problems here in the USA. High intakes of refined sugar are correlated with obesity and some types of diabetes, I think. I have never heard of sugar being correlated with strokes, atheroschlerosis, colon, liver, or kidney cancer, or osteoporosis.

Our total caloric intake is astronomical. So is our saturated fat and protein intake.

I highly recommend against low-carb diets.

And while they may result in quick weight loss, they have not been proven effective for long-term weight loss.

American Heart Assocation:
http://216.185.112.5/presenter.jhtml?identifier=11234
These diets can cause a quick drop in weight because eliminating carbohydrates causes a loss of body fluids. Lowering carbohydrate intake also prevents the body from completely burning fat. In the diets that are also high in protein, substances called ketones are formed and released into the bloodstream, a condition called ketosis. It makes dieting easier because it lowers appetite and may cause nausea.
 
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  • #28
adrenaline
Science Advisor
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You are right dissident dan. the Atkin's diet is useful for those who are sedentary and less active. definately, not a diet for those of us who are athletes or active. As much as I don't like atkin's (high rates of gallstones, gout flares, kidney stones, worsening of osteoperosis), he did help catalyze how we are rethinking protein and carbohydrate proportions. In fact, the recent food pyramid by the World Health Organization was a big change in that it advocated a greater amount of protein proportion. (What most people still don't realize is the the food pyramid recommendations are based on the tacit assumption that people are getting in an hour of mild to moderate activity a day!) The other problem is the longest trial conducted on the Atkins was only carried out at about a year. Actually, it showed that the atkin's was superior for early weight loss but after one year, compared to proportion reduction, both groups lost the same amount of weight at the year mark. I also don't like the fact that it avoids many anticancer foods and encourages grilling etc. which we know creates carcinogens. in the medical arena, the atkin's is most useful when a patient needs to lose 40 -50 pounds quickly before a surgery (classic example is a knee replacement, where if the patient is above a certain body mass index, the orthopedist will refuse to preform it due to the fact that the weight will destroy the newly replaced joint. (By the way, knee replacement surgeries are fast becoming a top orthopedic surgery due directly to obesity's effect on knee deterioration.)

I prefer the mediterranean diet, has good epidimiological benefits on cholesterol, etc. without the severe restricitons of super low fat (ie: Pritikin) or super high protein diets.
 
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  • #29
member 5645
Originally posted by adrenaline


I prefer the mediterranean diet, has good epidimiological benefits on cholesterol, etc. without the severe restricitons of super low fat (ie: Pritikin) or super high protein diets.
What is that?:)
My diet consists of a 40/40/20 caloric split between protein, carbs, and fat. I emphasize a well rounded diet (low saturated fat,try to stay low on sodium, complex and simple carbs, lots of veggies throughout the day, drink about 1.5 gallons of water). My portions are probably larger than most (I take in right about 3000 calories a day, about 250g protein). This is all due to my workout routine, which at the moment, is focused on bulking.

Now that you know that much, I would like to know about two things:

1>Tuna and mercury content. I have started to abstain from more than a can a week after a recent hopkins study I read relating low levels of mercury over a long period of time with lowered basic motor skills. Any opinions? research you can point me to?
2>Eggs. I eat 3 eggs a day, 6 days a week. I have been doing this for about a year, and recently had my cholestorl checked. Everything was fine. How can this be? Am I doing something to counteract the effect, or is the data I've read concerning dietary cholestorol having little effect on blood cholestorol accurate?

:)
 
  • #30
adrenaline
Science Advisor
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3
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3173077.stm

The mediterranean diet is a diet like the one consumed by heart-healthy people along the Mediterranean: rich in vegetables and fruits, whole grains, nuts, unsaturated vegetable oils and protein derived from fish, beans and chicken, not red meat. And I really like the red wine and olive oil bit...hee hee hee. (sounds yummy and doable for a lifetime...no?)

This view was thoroughly reviewed in The Journal of the American Medical Association by Dr. Frank B. Hu and Dr. Walter C. Willett, nutrition and epidemiology experts at the Harvard School of Public Health, who have followed tens of thousands of Americans for decades to uncover relationships between diet, habits and health.


As for fish ingestion:


The warnings are with pregnant women (since mercury affects the develping fetus), nursing mothers and young children (whose brains are more susceptible to mercury toxicity) that they eat no more than six ounces of albacore tuna or about one meal's worth each week. the recommendations differ according to the type of tuna, with light tuna having less mercury.

The new guidelines will say that young children and women who are pregnant, nursing or planning to become pregnant can eat up to 12 ounces per week of light tuna, which has less mercury and accounts for about 13 percent of the nation's seafood consumption.

Also, those groups limit their intake of shark, swordfish, king mackerel and tilefish, which can also have high levels of mercury.

Otherwise, I don't worry too much, otherwise the Eskimos would be running around with an epidemic of mercury poisoining in the adult population.

In addition, there is gobs of data on fish ingestion and protection against heart disease, strokes, sudden death etc. http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/full/94/9/2337 A review in circulation. Depending on the studies, people who eat fish once or more each week can reduce their risk of sudden cardiac death by 50-70 per cent. Thus, it does still help prevent the number one cause of death in this country.
 
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  • #31
adrenaline
Science Advisor
100
3
Here is more on the mediterranean diet vs. the antiquated USDA food pyramid ( rmember, the latter was not founded on good science and was also influenced by the dep of agriculture )

http://www.oldwayspt.org/pyramids/med/med_qa.html#q1 [Broken]
 
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  • #32
Zero
Well, Atkins is frankly too restrictive, and not heart-healthy. A good compromise is the South Beach diet, which allows carbs, but generally relies mostly on fruit and vegetables to provide them. Plus, since it puts so much emphasis on eating vegetables, you get all your vitamins and what-not.

I don't think carbs are the problem, it is the refined sugar. When you get your carbs in complex forms along with fiber and fat, they don't just get dumped into your bloodstream.
 

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