Anyone here help out with the LHC@home sixtrack?I recently started

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Anyone here help out with the LHC@home sixtrack?

I recently started and find it pretty neat, not really much to do apart from sit and watch results be processed, but knowing it is helping the LHC is a good feeling.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
768
4


That looks cool. But what's the deal with this: "The applications run by SIXTRACK may cause some computers to overheat. If this happens, stop running SIXTRACK or use a utility program that limits CPU usage."?
 
  • #3
rhody
Gold Member
630
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That looks cool. But what's the deal with this: "The applications run by SIXTRACK may cause some computers to overheat. If this happens, stop running SIXTRACK or use a utility program that limits CPU usage."?
That's funny Arcana, Callum FYI,

I use two clients http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/download_network.php" [Broken] Clients when I want to heat stress my dual core CPU's, works like a charm to. I use Einstein Home to analyze data in the background. If I have a fan or inherent heat problem, the constant bounce between 30 - 100% CPU use never fails me. If it stays up I know I am good to go. Crazy, huh, you can tweak the amount of CPU used too. I had a heat sink problem with my home grown PC and two BOINC Clients pushed it over the edge. Got a new industrial strength heat sink, glued the processor to it, stressed the crap out of it using the same two clients, no heat shutdowns, good to go. A great diagnostic tool, IMHO.

Rhody...

P.S. My home grown PC was built by a friend, small motherboard, small case footprint, no overclocking with CPU's. No need because I am not a gammer. It was an intermittent problem, but use of BOINC and Einstein Home proved it was a heat sink problem.
 
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  • #4
AlephZero
Science Advisor
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"The applications run by SIXTRACK may cause some computers to overheat. If this happens, stop running SIXTRACK or use a utility program that limits CPU usage."?
Translation: there are lots of people out there who built their own customized PCs without reallly knowing what they were doing.

Overclocking + undercooling + intensive computation = fried chips.
 
  • #5
IMP
21
1


I run folding@home on occasion and can verify that it makes extreme amounts of heat come out of your computer. I fold on both of my video cards and three of my four CPU cores. I only fold in the winter though, it just makes too much heat. If I lived in Alaska I might fold 24/7, even then I would probably have to open a window...
 
  • #6
rhody
Gold Member
630
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I run folding@home on occasion and can verify that it makes extreme amounts of heat come out of your computer. I fold on both of my video cards and three of my four CPU cores. I only fold in the winter though, it just makes too much heat. If I lived in Alaska I might fold 24/7, even then I would probably have to open a window...
IMP,

So your gaming PC is a heat source, that is hilarious... :rofl:

Rhody...
 
  • #7
IMP
21
1


IMP,

So your gaming PC is a heat source, that is hilarious... :rofl:

Rhody...
Absolutely, lots of heat. Not to mention that every fan in the computer goes to max and stays there, it is really loud. I have a 1250 watt modular power supply and I think it is running near its max while folding, it can heat an entire room in minutes.

If you want to stress test a new computer just run one of these distributed computing programs for a while...

P.S. If you want to see how many hardcore folding machines there are out there, use Google image search and look for "folding rig" and even "folding farm". There are thousands of individuals and universities out there folding right now, and some of them spend crazy amounts of money on their folding rigs. There are even new "video cards" that have no video output that are geared towards projects like these, see Tesla card by Nvidia.
 
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  • #8
768
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So would it be a bad idea for me to run the LHC@home on my ordinary came-that-way-in-a-box computer?
 
  • #9
IMP
21
1


So would it be a bad idea for me to run the LHC@home on my ordinary came-that-way-in-a-box computer?
Not at all, it should run just fine. But be mindful that you will not able to use the computer for anything else while it runs, it will make the computer run at its limits, and you are paying right out of your pocket for the electricity to run it (and to run the A/C to remove the heat).
There are many worthwhile distributed computing projects out there that would love for you to join them.
 
  • #10
rhody
Gold Member
630
3


Not at all, it should run just fine. But be mindful that you will not able to use the computer for anything else while it runs, it will make the computer run at its limits, and you are paying right out of your pocket for the electricity to run it (and to run the A/C to remove the heat).
There are many worthwhile distributed computing projects out there that would love for you to join them.
IMP, Arcana,

Do you know of any freeware to give you the temperature of the CPU(s) ? That would have been handy to have. I found this http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/", but haven't tried it. Maybe Arcana can experiment and report back.

I tried to donate my time to the LHC@Home project, back in April 2010, and was never able to get sixtrack or garfield simulations to run on my PC. Here is a http://www.lhcportal.com/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=561&hilit=rhody" I documented it in. I since gave up donating my cpu cores to BOINC and clients that run under it. But as I said earlier I highly recommend it if you suspect your PC CPU(s) is/are overheating. Again, I used Einstein@Home to test my PC, the clients worked just fine.

My hardware friend who built the box said that built in protection to shutdown the CPU's kicked in safely, so I had no damage as a result of the test. If you are overclocked, I have no advice to give, proceed at your own peril.

Rhody...
 
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  • #11
253
1


Do you know of any freeware to give you the temperature of the CPU(s) ? That would have been handy to have. I found this http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/", but haven't tried it. Maybe Arcana can experiment and report back.
Core Temp is alright, but its not the best. The best is HWMonitor, it gives you every piece of information you could need.
 
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  • #12
768
4


IMP, Arcana,

Do you know of any freeware to give you the temperature of the CPU(s) ? That would have been handy to have. I found this http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/", but haven't tried it. Maybe Arcana can experiment and report back.
I don't think experimenting would be a good idea for me.... :uhh:
I don't think I have enough computer knowledge to avoid a potentially damaging situation.
 
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