Are Supersymmetry Sparticles Paired with Antimatter Counterparts?

In summary, supersymmetry involves the existence of antimatter particles known as Susy sparticles that correspond to the standard model's antimatter particles. The concept is based on the idea of charge, as demonstrated in the case of the positron. However, due to the use of Weyl fermions, it is difficult to explain simply. It is uncertain whether a weyl fermion contains both the Left and Right components of a positron or the positive and negative charge components of a Left particle. If the latter is true, then the two scalar partners would consist of one positive and one negative.
  • #1
ggitt
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TL;DR Summary
Is there such a thing as an Antisparticle?
In supersymmetry, are there corresponding antimatter particles to the Susy sparticles similar to the corresponding standard model antimatter particles, e.g., antiselectron, etc.?
 
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  • #3
Charge is a big clue :-) Still, it is not easy to do a simple explanation because most supersymmetry is done with Weyl fermions. Let's take for reference the positron. Does a weyl fermion contains the Left and Right parts of the positron, or does it contain the positive and negative charge pieces of a Left particle, say? If the latter, does it mean that the two scalar partners are one of them positive and the other one negative?
 

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