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Are you Colorblind ?

  1. Normal

    33 vote(s)
    97.1%
  2. Protanopia

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Deuteranopia

    1 vote(s)
    2.9%
  4. Tritanopia

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Other

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Mar 29, 2012 #1
    I just discovered my younger brother to be colorblind. And while researching, learned that up-to as much as 8% males are colorblind. Lets see, how many among us are so.
    If you don't know if you are colorblind or not, you can google for some online tests, or use a basic test below.
    reduced_test.jpg
    Edit: A nice site for a better testing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 29, 2012 #2

    Pengwuino

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    I have a class with 7 students, 4 girls, 3 guys. All 3 guys are colorblind. Oddly enough, they are all in the same lab group and one experiment required them to read off resistor color codes.

    Yup, I had to tell the girls to basically give them the answer :P
     
  4. Mar 29, 2012 #3

    lisab

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    My father is colorblind - no idea what kind, though. I see slightly different colors in each eye (but each eye tests normal in the OP test). I've asked a few optometrists about it - they've never heard of such a thing :confused:.
     
  5. Mar 29, 2012 #4
    Nope, not color blind. But I have virtually no sense of smell which is just about as common and also more common among males. I could literally be covered in gasoline and not know it. It has made me more visually sensitive and I can literally picture 3D objects in my head in motion with diagram arrows and even translucent at times.
     
  6. Mar 29, 2012 #5

    Borek

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    Either males are colorblind, or females are making up stuff. Marzena has several blue t-shirts and she has a separate name for each blue.
     
  7. Mar 29, 2012 #6

    DaveC426913

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    I had a colour test done when i started working in the lab at Black's Cameras. My colour vision is confirmed spot-on.

    I'm a bit curious as to how this actually went down...

    Pengy: "Ashford, this was in last night's homework, can you please read off the codes on these resistors?"
    Ashford: "Um... no?"
    Pengy: "Why not?"
    Ashford: "I'm ... um ... colour blind?"
    Pengy: ":sigh: OK, Beckett, can you please read off the codes on..."
    Beckett: "I'm colour blind too."
    Crompton: "I'm colour blind - and so's my wife."
    Pengy: (aside) "Man. What're the odds??"

    :biggrin:
     
  8. Mar 29, 2012 #7

    Borg

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    I have a black coat that my wife swears is blue.
     
  9. Mar 29, 2012 #8
    I am NOT colorblind, thank God, and am, apparently, as sensitive to shades of colors as any woman. I think about color blindness a lot because I work in colored pencil a lot of the time and can never be confident that any viewer is even seeing the same drawing I am making.
     
  10. Mar 29, 2012 #9

    Q_Goest

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    I'm sorry, but I'm amazed by that! I assume you see a slightly different color depending on which eye you have open but you see one consistent color with both eyes looking at the object. Is that right?

    And how different are the colors? Just slightly different shades of the same color or are they significantly different? And what colors are they?

    If you were to look at something with one eye that appeared a different color to the other one, could you then find a second color that looked the same to the second eye when compared to the first color through the first eye? Or are there unique colors that only one eye can see and not the other???

    I think we need to do some experiments with you! <sinister grin>
     
  11. Mar 29, 2012 #10

    Monique

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    You could have a genetic mosaicism that comes above the water in the eye: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosaic_(genetics [Broken])

    You are not alone: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=(unilateral OR unilaterally) AND dichromatic (citation 1, 4, 5):smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  12. Mar 29, 2012 #11

    lisab

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    :tongue2:

    The differences are very slight but noticeable: I notice it in blue-green and yellow, both a bit more vivid in my right eye.

    That's just what my freshman biology prof said when I asked her about it! My dad is colorblind, so maybe for some reason more of the color cells in my left eye were formed using the X-chromosome he gave me...?

    One of the optometrists I talked to said his patients often say things look brighter in one eye.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  13. Mar 29, 2012 #12
    It probably is blue. You're seeing it in your house with indoor lighting that makes it look black. But when you put it on and wear it outside, then she can see it clearly. You can't see it because you're wearing it.
    Don't ask me why you can't see things you're wearing, that's just the way life is, especially when I need life to be that way so my explanation makes sense.
     
  14. Mar 29, 2012 #13

    DaveC426913

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    You might consider having your wife tested for tetrachromacy.

    It is the case of having 4 receptors. Very rare. Occurs mostly in women. Reports from these women describe exactly what you said: they see more shades - especially in the blue-green region - than others. Two shades that look identical to everyone else are quite obviously different to tetrachromats.
     
  15. Mar 29, 2012 #14
    I'm not colour bind but when the optician done the tests last time I managed to find numbers on the cards using the background shades.

    He didn't know what was going on until he got me to draw in the letters on a piece of paper held over the card.
     
  16. Mar 29, 2012 #15

    Monique

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    The genetic material in our cells can vary quite a bit, that's because of rapid divisions during development. The healthy gene could have been lost, mutated or silenced in the cells that formed the one eye. It's now more and more being accepted that it's not an uncommon process.
     
  17. Mar 29, 2012 #16
    other than when I was younger and my older sister would tease me and say "Oh no, did you say that the car was blue?! IT'S PURPLE, HE'S COLORBLIND!" no, I'm pretty sure I'm not colorblind, at least not according to that test
     
  18. Mar 29, 2012 #17

    I like Serena

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    Often people do not understand when I say I think something is black when they say it's obviously blue.
    In lamp light I have great difficulty distinguishing blue and green, and also orange and pink.
    But in daylight I have no trouble distinguishing them.

    Looking at the test the conclusion is that I am normal.
    Still, I feel colorblind!
     
  19. Mar 29, 2012 #18

    DaveC426913

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    Your day vision (cones) detects colour; your night vision (rods) does not. So you're experiencing a normal input in that sense, but it's possibly exaggerated due to poor low-light vision.
     
  20. Mar 29, 2012 #19

    I like Serena

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    Somewhere I have learned that in color vision there are 2 axes: yellow-blue and green-red.
    Even though we have 3 types of receptors.
    Apparently color blindness consists of either one or both of those axes.

    For myself, I'm drawing the conclusion that my yellow-blue axis is weak, noticeably in poor lighting.
    Especially since I have no trouble at all to distinguish red from green.
     
  21. Mar 29, 2012 #20

    Danger

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    I don't consider myself colour blind, but I'm not sure what the parameters are. Most of the time, I find it nearly impossible to discern between adjacent panels on my Pantone chart, but that sometimes means the difference of one drop of green or white or whatever in a litre of ink.
     
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