Artificial eyes and optic nerves

In summary: Glaucoma is a condition in which damage to the optic nerve causes loss of vision. It is the most common cause of legal blindness in the United States. In people with glaucoma, the optic nerve is damaged by increased pressure inside the eye. This can happen because of a problem with the drainage system in the eye, called glaucoma, or because of a problem with the way the eye’s lens works. In summary, millions of people have Glaucoma and are about to lose the sight to Glaucoma or just generally the blind. There are many different types of artificial eyes, but
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There are millions of Glaucoma patients who lost or about to lose the sight to Glaucoma or just generally the blind which numbers in millions too. I know a person who has Glaucoma.

I just want to know what is the status with artificial eyes and growing optic nerves at present and forthcoming. The visual cortex is at the back of brain. When will we have the technology so the blind can see (even coarse resolution) by directly connecting some optics nerves and retina sensors at the back of the head (by knowledge of some minimum language of the brain and interfacing to neurons in the visual cortex)? That is. If the front is far, then eyes at back of head won't be bad than having nothing to see.
 
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I suspect that there is far more effort being put into preventing blindness and the effort is certainly paying off, the outcome for people with Glaucoma is largely dependent on early and effective treatment. In people currently diagnosed with glaucoma less than 5% will go totally blind and this could still improve.
Developing artificial vision is horribly complex but even there the device mentioned by Tom.G seems to have been developed further with electrodes being attached directly to the visual cortex, the results seem better than the retinal implants. While the brain does seem to attempt to make sense of the signals it receives, the results are very limited and in both cases the surgery carries significant risk. In devices that have an external port there is a significant infection risk that increases over time. In the case of the electrodes to the visual cortex they are only allowed to leave it in place for 6 months.
Personally I think that the greatest possibilities come from the development of biological therapies that lead to repair of the structures involved.
https://www.technologyreview.com/20...r-blind-people-jacks-directly-into-the-brain/
 
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For those with glaucoma, how many pieces of optics nerves remaining before they could still make out objects in the world and what resolution is it like equal to?
 
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jake jot said:
For those with glaucoma, how many pieces of optics nerves remaining before they could still make out objects in the world and what resolution is it like equal to?
Glaucoma is really defined by the damage to the optic nerve the relationship between this and the intra occular pressure is still unclear, its not really a single condition. I'm not sure its possible to quantify the amount of damage other than by looking at the loss of vision which commonly starts at the periphery of the visual field, this can lead to an effect almost like looking down a tunnel.
This is a useful site with lots of links, one specifically about the latest research which is interesting.
https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/glaucoma
 
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