At what temperature does Petroleum burn?

In summary, the conversation discussed the burning point and temperatures of petroleum and other household oils, as well as the fuel used to start a campfire with coal. Flashpoints and autoignition temperatures were mentioned, with the second link showing that most oils will burn at around 1950°C. It was also noted that in a large enough fire, temperatures can reach much higher levels.
  • #1
At what temperature does Petroleum burn? Can you name any other common house hold oils which burn, and at what temperature? I'm also interested in the fuel you use to start a campfire with coal.
 
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  • #4
Keep in mind that almost any temperature, within material limits, can be reached with a furnace-type setup, so in a big enough fire, temperatures can be significantly higher.
 
  • #5


Petroleum, also known as crude oil, is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons that can vary in composition and therefore have different burning temperatures. Generally, the combustion temperature of petroleum can range from 300 to 600 degrees Celsius (572 to 1112 degrees Fahrenheit) depending on its specific composition.

Some other common household oils that can burn include vegetable oils such as canola oil, olive oil, and coconut oil. These oils have a lower combustion temperature compared to petroleum, ranging from 200 to 300 degrees Celsius (392 to 572 degrees Fahrenheit).

As for starting a campfire with coal, the most commonly used fuel is charcoal. Charcoal is made from wood that has been heated in the absence of oxygen, resulting in a highly carbonized material that can ignite at temperatures around 350 degrees Celsius (662 degrees Fahrenheit). However, the exact temperature can vary depending on the type and quality of the charcoal.

It's important to note that the temperature at which these oils and fuels ignite can also be affected by external factors such as air flow and the presence of other combustible materials. It's always important to handle and use these substances with caution to prevent accidents and injuries.
 

1. What is the ignition temperature of Petroleum?

The ignition temperature of Petroleum, also known as its auto-ignition temperature, is typically between 400-500 degrees Celsius (750-930 degrees Fahrenheit). However, this can vary depending on the specific composition and purity of the Petroleum.

2. Can Petroleum catch fire at room temperature?

No, Petroleum will not catch fire at room temperature (around 25 degrees Celsius or 77 degrees Fahrenheit). It requires a much higher temperature, typically above 400 degrees Celsius, to ignite.

3. How does the ignition temperature of Petroleum compare to other fuels?

The ignition temperature of Petroleum is generally higher than other common fuels, such as gasoline or diesel. Gasoline, for example, has an ignition temperature of around 250-280 degrees Celsius (480-540 degrees Fahrenheit).

4. What factors can affect the ignition temperature of Petroleum?

The ignition temperature of Petroleum can be affected by several factors, including the composition and purity of the Petroleum, the presence of impurities or contaminants, and the concentration of oxygen in the surrounding environment.

5. Is the ignition temperature of Petroleum the same as its flash point?

No, the flash point of Petroleum is the temperature at which it will give off enough vapor to ignite in the presence of an ignition source. This is typically lower than the ignition temperature, which is the temperature at which the Petroleum will spontaneously ignite without an external ignition source.

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