Atmospheric Extinction of Light

  • Thread starter MK-IV
  • Start date
  • #1
2
0
If I have a 2,000 candelas red light source under normal rural atmospheric conditions at what distance would I expect the source to no longer be visible to the eye?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Drakkith
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
21,152
4,993
Are you assuming an atmosphere that is almost completely free of dust and other particles that would also absorb the light?
 
  • #3
2
0
I am assuming a normal rural atmosphere in the western United States containing dusts with a relatively low humidity component.
 
  • #4
Drakkith
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
21,152
4,993
I am assuming a normal rural atmosphere in the western United States containing dusts with a relatively low humidity component.

Hrmm. I can't help you out, but hopefully someone else can.
 
  • #5
If I have a 2,000 candelas red light source under normal rural atmospheric conditions at what distance would I expect the source to no longer be visible to the eye?

At first glance, it would seem that this may depend on the time of day. In the way that the Sun blinds us from stars.
 
  • #6
K^2
Science Advisor
2,469
29
I have no idea where to actually get sufficient data to compute this, but from visibility requirements I remember from flight training, I could tell you that the answer would vary greatly with weather, season, and location. So if you need a specific answer, you are going to have to provide more specific situation.
 

Related Threads on Atmospheric Extinction of Light

  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
670
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
954
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
768
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
15K
Top