Beauty of old electrical and measuring things, etc.

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DrClaude

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*speechless*
 

OmCheeto

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*speechless*
After two hours of googling, I would recommend reading this persons comment from below the video, before doing the same:

Jayyy Zeee
I have a degree in computer science and electrical engineering, have been working professionally in the field for over 20 years, and I have no clue how that coil stores bits.

also speechless
 

Averagesupernova

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I would assume it 'stores bits' the same way a shift register who's output feeds its input. There are roulette games based on this. A shift register is loaded with a single bit set to one out of however many wide the register is. For the sake of discussion lets say 24 bits wide. There is an oscillator that runs to shift this single bit around and around. The oscillator is set so it's frequency decays off and it simply stops. Where this single bit that is loaded with a one stops may or may not be where the player guessed it would be.
=
It is the same with this coil except it is mechanical. There is no need for a clock oscillator to keep the 'bits' moving as this is just a natural property of the coil. I will say it is hard to believe they could get that to work, but it is plausible. I wonder how long was needed to store what they needed to store? How many times around?
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This may be nitpicking, but can this thing truly be called 100% electronic considering the coil is technically mechanical? At any rate, someone must have had a bad dream to think that thing up. LOL
 

OmCheeto

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...
This may be nitpicking, but can this thing truly be called 100% electronic considering the coil is technically mechanical?
...
hmmm......
per wiki; "As of February 2016, 97% of all articles in Wikipedia eventually lead to the article Philosophy."

:nb)
 

Nidum

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After two hours of googling, I would recommend reading this persons comment from below the video, before doing the same:

Jayyy Zeee
I have a degree in computer science and electrical engineering, have been working professionally in the field for over 20 years, and I have no clue how that coil stores bits.
Google ' acoustic delay line memory ' .

There is a mercury column version as well
 

OmCheeto

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OmCheeto

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Only out of scientific curiosity . Did you record the maximum pressure reached ?
No.
But it would have been irrelevant, IMHO, if I had.

ps. Let's get back onto the.... oh, poop: Old.... Things.
 

Baluncore

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There is nothing new about acoustic delay line memories. Don't forget that the integral clock and data pulse timing must be continuously received, restored and retransmitted.

One advantage of delay line memory is that the ALU need only be a one bit serial processor. Another is that CORDIC can be applied to compute the arithmetic +, −, ×, ÷ and √ using shift registers and two serial adders alone. Later, with the addition of diode array lookup tables, all the transcendental functions could be implemented.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CORDIC

RPN and CORDIC went on to be used in the HP calculator range.
CORDIC was implemented in all the intel 80x87 FPU coprocessors.
 

dlgoff

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*speechless*
Me too.
What I liked most about the video was at time 7:26 when Cliff said, "Why do I work on this? It's partly out of respect of those who came before me." Reminds me of this quote from a PF member: " ... Restoring some fine machine is honoring somebody's hard work." @Jim Hardy
Your effort is appreciated.

One advantage of delay line memory is that the ALU need only be a one bit serial processor. Another is that CORDIC can be applied to compute the arithmetic +, −, ×, ÷ and √ using shift registers and two serial adders alone. Later, with the addition of diode array lookup tables, all the transcendental functions could be implemented.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CORDIC

RPN and CORDIC went on to be used in the HP calculator range.
CORDIC was implemented in all the intel 80x87 FPU coprocessors.
From piano wire to silicon processors. Who would have thought ...? Thanks.
 
Best thread on the entire Internet.... I am fascinated by the development of electro magnetic technology through time, and love old electrical and computer equipment. Once, I was puttering around in northern Vermont near the Canadian border, and a couple had a garage sale out. It was her late father's stuff, a former electrical engineer. It was half a dozen shelves crammed with meters, gauges, scopes, TRS-80s, Lisa's, Apple IIs, Commodore 128s, amplifiers, tools, etc.

I had to leave quick, I could feel my wallet squirming to get out of my pocket..... Viewing this thread is much safer.
 
20171026_124112_001.jpg
Here is a very old relay from a Grinder built around about WWII, using the once popular technique of mercury switching, note the wires are insulated with insulating porcelain beads.
 

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dlgoff

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@dlgoff
Yes its in what used to be an old textile mill in West Yorkshire UK which it would have been operating a lift between 2 floors only.

Edit ...
Yes! I forgot to say ignore the spare lamp, there are actually 2 mercury bulbs one behind the other, the beads were used because of the flexing the conductor would go through and the insulation materials of the day wouldn't have held up to the repeated movement.
 

dlgoff

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dlgoff

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Sometimes a little new can help the old. Like this vacuum angle valve I've added to my vacuum system. I have two Edwards E2M8 rotary pumps and with the valve, I can use the second Edwards to get a quicker pump down so I can turn on the diffusion pump sooner.

Here are the Edwards pumps:
Edwards.jpg


Here are two views of the angle valve:
anglevalve_1.jpg

anglevalve_2.jpg


Adds a little beauty doesn't it?
 

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dlgoff

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DrClaude

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How do people come up with some of these techniques?
I think that's what makes some of these devices so beautiful: the ingenuity that went into solving some problems.

Like the calculator memory in my post #251.
 

dlgoff

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I think that's what makes some of these devices so beautiful: the ingenuity that went into solving some problems.
Oh yea. I agree. And that is so amazing.
 

dlgoff

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I'll be posting some pictures later of an old Universal Radio I'm in the process of restoring but now I'm working late depositing copper onto glass and took a few pictures.
Up on post 269 I added a New part to the vacuum system. Since my house electrical circuit that powers the pumps (three of them) can't handle the surge on power up, I had to add a couple more New parts; time delay relays.

The vacuum deposition system:
vacuumdeposition.jpg


The time delay relays:
timedelayrelays.jpg


Copper being deposited on glass slide slip covers:
copperdeposition.jpg
 

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