Breaking the speed of light?

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of two objects traveling in opposite directions from each other at a speed greater than 0.5c. The question is whether an observer watching them perpendicular to their trajectory would see them moving faster than c away from each other or if there is something that would "stop" this. The response states that in the observer's reference frame, the rate of separation of the two objects does increase at a rate greater than c. However, relativity does prevent each object from going faster than c in the other object's reference frame. The expert's answer was able to clarify this uncertainty and provide the best explanation for the question.
  • #1
2 objects are traveling in opposite directions from each other with more than 0,5c. Would an observer watching them perpendicular to their trajectory see that they are moving faster than c away from each other, or is there something that will "stop" this?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
IN that observer's reference frame, the two objects' separation does increase at a rate greater that c. Relativity does not prevent the rate of separation of two objects in a third reference frame from being greater than c.

What relativity does prevent is each object going faster than c in the other object's reference frame.
 
  • #3
Thanks, that was exactly what I was uncertain about. You answered my question in the best possible way.
 

What is the speed of light?

The speed of light, denoted by c, is approximately 299,792,458 meters per second. It is considered to be the fastest possible speed in the universe and is a fundamental constant in physics.

Why is it believed that the speed of light cannot be exceeded?

According to Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity, the speed of light is the maximum speed at which energy, information, or matter can travel. This is because as an object approaches the speed of light, its mass increases and requires an infinite amount of energy to continue accelerating.

What would happen if an object were to break the speed of light?

If an object were to exceed the speed of light, it would violate the laws of physics as we know them. The object's mass would become infinite, and time would essentially stop for that object. Additionally, the object's energy would also become infinite, making it impossible to achieve this feat.

Is it possible to travel faster than the speed of light?

As of our current understanding of physics, it is not possible to travel faster than the speed of light. However, scientists are constantly exploring new theories and ideas that may challenge this notion in the future.

Are there any exceptions to the speed of light limit?

One exception to the speed of light limit is the expansion of the universe. The universe itself is not bound by the laws of physics, and therefore, space can expand faster than the speed of light. However, this does not contradict the speed of light limit as objects within the universe are still subject to it.

Suggested for: Breaking the speed of light?

Replies
10
Views
756
Replies
34
Views
854
Replies
16
Views
288
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
78
Views
4K
Replies
6
Views
1K
Replies
74
Views
3K
Replies
45
Views
3K
Back
Top