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Cable companies to encourage pirating again

  1. Apr 30, 2012 #1
    It's amazing how clueless these guys are! I cut the cable cord 3 years ago and will never go back. I'm still super ticked I can't get ESPN3 unless I get a cable subscription.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/business/tv_in_real_dime_ph0GiKk7rC9agDUEkHae2I
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 30, 2012 #2
    It is a bit shocking how completely out of touch the cable companies are. At one point during my lifetime, cable companies were considered high tech. It was a cutting-edge industry. Now, it seems like they're luddites incapable of adaptation.
     
  4. Apr 30, 2012 #3

    Evo

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    Wait, this is about non-cable companies, like Hulu striking deals with cable companies to restrict their online access to cable users.

    So Hulu is a turn coat. Not saying cable companies aren't gladly working these deals.

    It's all based on money. No one is doing anything for the consumer out of the goodness of their heart.

    Who needs tv, I have PF!!!!

    Hulu made their first deal last year with DISH. If you wanted to watch a show the next day, you had to be a DISH customer and they told people that were blocked from viewing to contact their cable or satellite provider to make a deal with Hulu if we wanted to watch shows next day, otherwise wait 8 days. I gladly waited the 8 days. Heck it was only the one time I'd miss a show anyway. No big deal.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2012
  5. Apr 30, 2012 #4

    Evo

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    Greg, start an online tv station!!!!! Count me in as your first paying customer!
     
  6. Apr 30, 2012 #5
    I think I'd be happier if we could cut out the distributors altogether and just pay the content creators directly. I'd be much more willing to subscribe to, say HBO or Showtime if I didn't also have to have a cable package along with it. Let me give HBO $10 or $15 a month directly for access to any of their shows online, and I'd be on that.

    The BBC is doing that, I believe. They launched "global" access to their iPlayer app to 11 counties (not including the US), and are looking into giving access here too. Hopefully, they release it for the US, because I'd pay for that in a second.
     
  7. Apr 30, 2012 #6
    The à la carte method of content delivery does sound appealing. But one has to wonder, if network X is making all the money, then networks 1,2,3,...,n would follow X. Nothing new comes from that. Look at all the cookie cutter "blockbuster" movies and such we have now. There is something to say for purchasing a sort of package deal (cable) which essentially subsidizes low popularity or niche channels.

    PS: I had hulu plus this past week and already canceled it. Really hulu, you're going to list shows and movies like I can watch them and then link me to HBO.com or something when I click and try to sell me cable packages?? Back to netflix...
     
  8. Apr 30, 2012 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    No kidding! I tried Hulu Plus and couldn't even figure out what extra features I was getting. I canceled almost immediately.
     
  9. May 1, 2012 #8

    Office_Shredder

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    If you get hulu plus basically all you get is the shows that are delayed a week normally are available immediately after they air.

    Of course not, they're all in the business to make money.

    I think this is evolving into a reasonable business model. You have a middleman, like Verizon, which you pay money to. In return they get you access to all the sites like espn3, hulu, hbogo etc. So instead of having to manage subscriptions to every channel/show you want to watch, you get them all at once
     
  10. May 1, 2012 #9
    Really? I think this is evolving away from a reasonable business model, with all the outrage I've heard.
     
  11. May 1, 2012 #10

    turbo

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    I have Dish, simply because the broadcast TV is unreliable or unavailable, and there is no cable out here. Counting this house, there are 8 houses on this stretch of road leading to Route 201 (where the cable passes). 8 Houses (one unoccupied) in over 2 miles...nope! no cable ever.

    The only time I actually watch TV is for the news. If Dish is on at other times, it's so I can listen to BB King's Bluesville mix on Sirius XM. We have a collection of favorite movies on DVD and the DVD player gets more performance time than Dish.

    There is a PBS show about Jesse Owens tonight (8 Eastern), and I'll probably watch that. There is little or nothing on TV that interests me, though. Dish will stay because my wife likes to unwind after work by watching Law and Order or NCIS.

    Greg, if you take Evo's advice and start an on-line TV outlet, you could begin by looping BBC's "Planet Earth" videos (the Attenborough narration, please). Educational and entertaining for young and old. I hate seeing kids parked in front of a screen for hours, but "Planet Earth" would be a welcome exception.
     
  12. May 1, 2012 #11
    Slightly tangential to the discussion but I was given the Planet Earth series on Blu-Ray by a family member and it really does look superb in 1080p in addition to being expertly narrated. Almost worth my licence fee by itself.
     
  13. May 1, 2012 #12
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