Calculate Stress in "Y" Direction: σ=P/A Equation

In summary, the stress σ in the "y" direction can be found using the equation σ=P/A, where P is the distributed load and A is the cross-sectional area. Using this equation, we can see that σ=P/A=(-0.8*10^6N)/(0.4m*0.02m)=-100*10^6Pa. It is important to carry the units correctly and a shortcut can be used by dividing the distributed load by the width.
  • #1
Xenix
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1. I need to know the stress σ in the "y" direction.



2. I will use σ=P/A equation.



3. First (-2*10^6)N*0.4m=-0.8*10^6N
Then σ=P/A=(-0.8*10^6N)/(0.4m*0.02m)=-100*10^6Pa.

Is this corrects?
 

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  • #2
Looks right to me.

Some suggestions:
-always carry the units through correctly to make sure you are doing it right; I think the first step you did missed the N/m
-you probably don't need to convert everything to N and use *10^6 everywhere; it saves some time and probably less mistakes just to leave the M in there to the end;
-a shortcut here is to just divide the distributed load by the width since a distributed load is sort of like the stress already in one dimension
 
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Related to Calculate Stress in "Y" Direction: σ=P/A Equation

1. What is the equation for calculating stress in the "Y" direction?

The equation for calculating stress in the "Y" direction is σ = P/A, where σ is the stress, P is the applied force, and A is the cross-sectional area.

2. What are the units of measurement for stress in the "Y" direction?

Stress is typically measured in units of force per unit area, such as pounds per square inch (psi) or newtons per square meter (N/m²).

3. How do you determine the cross-sectional area (A) in the stress equation?

The cross-sectional area (A) can be determined by measuring the width and height of the object and multiplying them together. If the object has a complex shape, the area can be calculated using geometric formulas.

4. Can the stress equation be used for all types of materials?

The stress equation can be used for most materials, as long as the material remains in the elastic region and follows Hooke's Law. However, for materials that exhibit plastic deformation, the stress equation may not accurately represent the stress.

5. How does stress in the "Y" direction affect the material?

The stress in the "Y" direction can cause the material to deform or change shape. If the stress exceeds the material's yield strength, it can lead to permanent deformation or failure of the material. Understanding the stress in a material is important for designing and predicting the behavior of structures and components.

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