Calculating point charges and ratio of electrostatic force to weight

In summary, a honeybee in flight can acquire an electrostatic charge of 93 pC. To produce this charge, Ne electrons must be transferred. When two bees with this charge are separated by a distance of 12 cm, the magnitude of the electrostatic force between them is N. The ratio of this electrostatic force to the weight of a 0.14 gm bee is 3.783e-7.
  • #1
zooboodoo
29
0

Homework Statement


Measurements show that a honeybee in active flight can acquire an electrostatic charge on the order of 93 pC.

a)How many electrons much be transferred to produce this charge?
Ne = *
b) Supposing two bees, both with this charge, are separated by a distance of 12 cm. What is the magnitude of the electrostatic force between the these two bees? (You may treat the bees as point charges.)
FE= N *
5.399e-9 OKc) What is ratio of this electrostatic force to the weight of 0.14 gm bee?
FE/Fweight =
3.783e-7 NO


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



I got through the first two parts, but in order to calculate the ratio of the electro static force to the weight I simply tried Fe/Fweight, 5.39e-9 / .00014 = 3.856e-13
Is there a specific relationship between the forces that I should know before trying to proceed?
thanks
 
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  • #2
zooboodoo said:
Is there a specific relationship between the forces that I should know before trying to proceed?
Nope. They are completely different kinds of force (except for the fact that, in freshman physics, they both obey the inverse square law).
 
  • #3
for the help



Hello!

First, let's address the calculation for the number of electrons that must be transferred to produce a charge of 93 pC. The charge of an electron is typically represented as e = 1.6 x 10^-19 C. Therefore, to produce a charge of 93 pC, we can use the following equation:

93 pC = (Ne)(1.6 x 10^-19 C)

Solving for Ne, we get:

Ne = 93 pC / (1.6 x 10^-19 C) = 5.81 x 10^17 electrons

Now, for the electrostatic force between the two bees, we can use Coulomb's Law:

FE = (k * q1 * q2) / d^2

Where k is the Coulomb's constant (8.99 x 10^9 Nm^2/C^2), q1 and q2 are the charges of the two bees (both 93 pC), and d is the distance between them (12 cm = 0.12 m). Plugging in the values, we get:

FE = (8.99 x 10^9 Nm^2/C^2) * (93 x 10^-12 C) * (93 x 10^-12 C) / (0.12 m)^2 = 5.399 x 10^-9 N

For the ratio of this electrostatic force to the weight of the bee, we can simply divide the electrostatic force by the weight of the bee (0.14 g = 0.00014 kg). Therefore, we get:

FE/Fweight = (5.399 x 10^-9 N) / (0.00014 kg) = 3.856 x 10^-5

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any further questions. Keep up the good work in your studies!
 

Related to Calculating point charges and ratio of electrostatic force to weight

1. How do you calculate point charges?

To calculate point charges, you can use the Coulomb's law formula, which states that the force between two point charges is equal to the product of their charges divided by the square of the distance between them. The formula is F = (k * q1 * q2)/r^2, where k is the Coulomb's constant, q1 and q2 are the charges, and r is the distance between them.

2. What is the ratio of electrostatic force to weight?

The ratio of electrostatic force to weight is known as the electrostatic force per unit weight. It is calculated by dividing the electrostatic force by the weight of the object. This ratio is often used to determine the stability of an object in an electric field.

3. How does distance affect the electrostatic force between two charges?

The electrostatic force between two charges is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. This means that as the distance between the charges increases, the electrostatic force decreases. In other words, the force becomes weaker as the charges are moved further apart.

4. What is the unit of measurement for electrostatic force?

The unit of measurement for electrostatic force is Newtons (N). This is because electrostatic force is a type of force, and force is measured in Newtons. However, in some cases, the force may be expressed in other units such as Coulombs (C) or Volts (V), depending on the specific situation.

5. How does the charge of an object affect the electrostatic force?

The charge of an object has a direct impact on the electrostatic force between two objects. According to Coulomb's law, the force increases as the charges of the objects increase. This means that the greater the charge of an object, the stronger the electrostatic force it exerts on other objects. Additionally, objects with opposite charges will attract each other, while objects with like charges will repel each other.

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