Calculating time taken to boil water

  • Thread starter Ninjabear
  • Start date
  • #26
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sorry guys i imagine this is frustrating for you (like pulling teeth)

i'll have one more go at explaining and if no joy i'll call it a day as I don't want to waste your time!

ok what i need to achieve:

• I have a car oven (to cure the paint)
• Paint cures at a certain temp for a period of time (160-210°C for 30 to 60mins)
• I need to test the oven prior to spraying to ensure the paint has met that criteria
• I have a data logger with thermocouples situated at relevant points inside the oven
• The logger i have has a max working temp of 100°C (thats what i have to work with)
• I obviously need a water tank to ensure the logger survives the process.
• I was going to use the kiln to test the tank but if you guys can help me with the calculations i won't need to.

So as i know the details of the kiln i was going to use that as my base/control calculations (imagine the kiln was the oven).

Does this make sense? - please say yes lol
 
  • #27
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I agree with Sophiecentaur. If your real interest is an industrial oven or a furnace, analysis of this tiny little kiln will not translate properly to the larger scale. Why don't you tell us about the actual industrial equipment and operation, including cycle time or continuous throughput rate, objects being dried, shapes, sizes, air circulation, venting, etc? I'm getting the feeling that you're trying to design an industrial dryer and you're trying to get some free consultation. We can help you to a point, but, if the project requires man-hours of design time, it might be appropriate to hire a consultant. Also note that you have already occupied several experts on an analysis that probably doesn't even apply to your real world interest because you did not see the value in sharing what the real application details are.

Chet
 
  • #28
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i am only trying to design a water tank that will take the logger and ensure it survives the monitoring process of an oven.
Im not designing a dryer? and im sorry if you think im using you for free consultancy.

I was only after an equation or equations to allow me to calculate it for myself.

I have told you everything i was intending to do and why and certainly have not deceived you.

I do appreciate all your expertise and time you have given me

I'll guess i'll have to try and read up more on these books and stop pestering you

Hope you all have a great weekend!
Thanks again

*CLOSE POST
 
  • #29
sophiecentaur
Science Advisor
Gold Member
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I could sum this up.
There is no point in trying to measure high temperatures in the way you propose. You will get no sensible results. If this job is worth doing then just get the right transducer for it. You can get temperature loggers for a huge range of temperatures.
I don't think anyone on PF will think otherwise about this.
HAve a great week end yourself - and get looking on eBay - even if only for fun!
 
  • #30
19,775
4,029
i am only trying to design a water tank that will take the logger and ensure it survives the monitoring process of an oven.
Im not designing a dryer? and im sorry if you think im using you for free consultancy.

I was only after an equation or equations to allow me to calculate it for myself.

I have told you everything i was intending to do and why and certainly have not deceived you.

I do appreciate all your expertise and time you have given me

I'll guess i'll have to try and read up more on these books and stop pestering you

Hope you all have a great weekend!
Thanks again

*CLOSE POST
Please give us another chance. It is very helpful to know the actual application. Let me say the question back to you so I make sure we understand:

You have a big car oven/structure that is used for curing paint. You have a device that measures the temperature at various points inside the oven, but it will deteriorate quickly if the temperature is above 100C. You are going to put a tank of water in the oven with the car to keep the temperature below 100C in the oven. You want to know whether the tank will run dry before the paint has cured. Correct so far? So the 160 C curing temperature is dispensed with, and the curing is going to take place at 100C? Is there a concern about moisture affecting the curing of the paint?

Chet
 
  • #31
cjl
Science Advisor
1,775
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Is there a concern about moisture affecting the curing of the paint?
This is the big one, in my opinion. If you're putting this in an oven with curing paint, you'll be dramatically raising the humidity in the oven as the water evaporates. I'd be worried that this would affect the paint curing.

Is there any reason the device can't stay outside of the oven, with wires running to the inside of the oven where the thermocouples are?
 
  • #32
sophiecentaur
Science Advisor
Gold Member
24,094
4,209
Steam in ovens: If I want really crusty bread, I put a tray of water in the bottom of the oven. It certainly makes a difference - and it hits you right in the face if you open the door. Better check with the paint people.

But, there are plenty ways of remote monitoring of those sorts of temperatures. Do you just need extension leads on your thermocouples? You may be letting the tail wag the dog, as they say.
 

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