Can anyone translate this German for application to University of Hamburg?

  • #1
Wrichik Basu
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I am in the process of applying to the University of Hamburg. As an international student, I have to get my Indian certificates "converted" to the German system before the application begins in February. The university has released a set of rules for this: https://www.uni-hamburg.de/campusce...etter/en-anleitung-zeugnisanerkennung-uhh.pdf (jump to page 10).

I am trying to make an account in their student information network, but everything is in German. Even the names of countries have been translated to German. And I cannot seem to find India in the list.

1669476957697.png


It seems that "Indien" is closest to "Indian". Can anyone please confirm this? Because Google Translate says "Indien" means "in the event that."

Can someone also check the translation for this section:

1669477225783.png


This translates to:

1669477293458.png
 

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  • #4
PeroK
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It seems that "Indien" is closest to "Indian". Can anyone please confirm this? Because Google Translate says "Indien" means "in the event that."
Seriously? Just google for "german name for India". It must be Indien.
 
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  • #5
PeroK
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It's a good job you're not from the UK, because that's Vereinigtes Koenigreich.
 
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  • #6
Office_Shredder
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Don't you need to be able to speak German to go here?
 
  • #7
Wrichik Basu
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It's a good job you're not from the UK, because that's Vereinigtes Koenigreich.
But why would somebody translate the name of countries? Isn't that supposed to be a proper noun, and a "constant" in any language? Similar to name of people. "John" cannot become something else in another language.
 
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  • #8
Wrichik Basu
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Don't you need to be able to speak German to go here?
No, the course I am applying to is in English, and they have only asked for a certificate in English proficiency.
 
  • #9
PeroK
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But why would somebody translate the name of countries? Isn't that supposed to be a proper noun, and a "constant" in any language? Similar to name of people. "John" cannot become something else in another language.
You seriously think that Germany, Italy, Spain are all called that in those countries?

Many major cities have different names in each language: Muenchen is Munich; Koeln is Cologne; Milano is Milan; Napoli is Naples; Sevilla is Seville; Wien is Vienna. London is Londres in French; Edinburgh is Edimbourg. Many of the major cities in Switzerland (La Suisse, Der Schweiz, La Svizzera) have French and German names: Geneve, Genf; Lucerne, Luzern; Basle, Basel.

And that's just Europe.

PS the Matterhorn is Monte Cervino in Italian and Le Cervin in French.
 
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  • #10
Vanadium 50
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But why would somebody translate the name of countries?
Cote de Ivoire?
Timor-Leste?
Sierra Leone?
Cabo Verde?
El Salvador?
 
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  • #11
fresh_42
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It's a good job you're not from the UK, because that's Vereinigtes Koenigreich.
Worse than that: Vereinigtes Königreich. But you should be used to the Umlaut since ...


1669494192851.jpeg
 
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  • #12
phinds
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Many major cities have different names in each language: Muenchen is Munich; Koeln is Cologne; Milano is Milan; Napoli is Naples; Sevilla is Seville; Wien is Vienna. London is Londres in French; Edinburgh is Edimbourg. Many of the major cities in Switzerland (La Suisse, Der Schweiz, La Svizzera) have French and German names: Geneve, Genf; Lucerne, Luzern; Basle, Basel.
You left out my favorite: Lavorno (Italy) in English is Leghorn. Now isn't THAT intuitive :smile:
 
  • #13
PeroK
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Worse than that: Vereinigtes Königreich. But you should be used to the Umlaut
I can never remember how to find it on an English keyboard.
 
  • #14
fresh_42
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But why would somebody translate the name of countries? Isn't that supposed to be a proper noun, and a "constant" in any language? Similar to name of people. "John" cannot become something else in another language.
I doubt that India is the correct name in Hindi. Isn't it already translated?

And UK is:

a) united:
to unite, united, united = vereinigen, vereinigt, vereinigt
a verb independent of any country, ergo, there is already a translated version. Not using it would be strange.

b) kingdom = Königreich (n.)
This exists as a completely independent noun, too. So why not use it?

Whether names are translated or not has primarily historical reasons and how well the translation comes in naturally. E.g. France in German is Frankreich = Reich der Franken = (King-)dom of the Franks. If you look at the history, then you will find that it was the kingdom of franks long, long before it became France. We also say Neu-Delhi instead of New Delhi. (The use of New Delhi in the following quotation is due to Google's translation.)
German Wikipedia said:
The relationship between the names Delhi [Delhi] and New Delhi [Neu-Delhi] is complex. New Delhi [Neu-Delhi] is part of the metropolitan city of Delhi [Delhi], which is co-administered by the Indian central government as the National Capital Territory of Delhi [Delhi]. In a narrower sense, New Delhi [Neu-Delhi] only refers to the government district that was planned during the British colonial period, which only covers a very small part of the capital's territory and essentially corresponds to the borders of the municipal administration unit New Delhi [Neu-Delhi]. With the district of New Delhi [Neu-Delhi], which can be distinguished, there is another administrative unit of the same name with a different demarcation.

On the other hand, we say New York City instead of Neu-Amsterdam. It is strange when it comes to names. They have to be learned by heart anyway, so nobody really bothers a unification. E.g., the Rhône has no gender in English, is female in German, die Rhone, and male in France, le Rhône.
 
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  • #15
fresh_42
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I can never remember how to find it on an English keyboard.
No special treatment for Lemmy, that is sad to hear.
 
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  • #16
Jonathan Scott
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I can never remember how to find it on an English keyboard.
On Windows I have enabled UK Extended Keyboard, so "ö" is Alt-Gr with double-quote to set up the dead key umlaut accent then "o". That keyboard mapping covers quite a lot of accented characters that I use but unfortunately not the Swedish upper or lower case "Å", for which I usually use Character Map.
 
  • #17
fresh_42
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On Windows I have enabled UK Extended Keyboard, so "ö" is Alt-Gr with double-quote to set up the dead key umlaut accent then "o". That keyboard mapping covers quite a lot of accented characters that I use but unfortunately not the Swedish upper or lower case "Å", for which I usually use Character Map.

In such cases, I use Wikipedia for translation and copy paste it:
https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anders_Ångström
 
  • #18
PeroK
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No special treatment for Lemmy, that is sad to hear.
I bought Motorhead's first album in white vinyl from the Greyfriars (second hand) record market in Edinburgh in 1981 during my first year at university.

The best track as I recall was Iron Horse.
 
  • #19
Vanadium 50
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Lavorno (Italy) in English is Leghorn. Now isn't THAT intuitive
Son, I say, son, am I going too fast for y'all?
 
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  • #20
gmax137
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You seriously think that Germany, Italy, Spain are all called that in those countries?
I have wondered why we say "Germany" in English when they say "Deutschland" in ... Deutsch. I mean, it isn't even close. They are clearly two different words. Unlike these:
Milano is Milan; Napoli is Naples; Sevilla is Seville
 
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  • #21
gmax137
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So, I say, son, am I going too fast for y'all?
sirena da nebbia lavorno?
 
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  • #22
PeroK
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I have wondered why we say "Germany" in English when they say "Deutschland" in ... Deutsch. I mean, it isn't even close. They are clearly two different words. Unlike these:
I don't know. The French call Germany Allemagne. Austria is L'Autriche in French and Österreich in German. So, some country names have quite a lot of variation. Whereas, Italy, Italie, Italian, Italia are all minor variations.

I've also noticed that (I think) all French city names are spelled the same in English, even if the pronunciation is different. Paris, rather than Paree. In Spain there is only Seville that's slightly different. In Germany there are a few. But, almost all the major Italian city names are different in English: Milan, Naples, Florence, Rome, Genoa, Turin, Venice.

You could easily research this, I imagine.
 
  • #23
pbuk
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The best track as I recall was Iron Horse.
I prefer the earlier On Parole version - more bluesy.

You left out my favorite: Lavorno (Italy) in English is Leghorn. Now isn't THAT intuitive :smile:
It's Livorno.

I have wondered why we say "Germany" in English when they say "Deutschland" in ... Deutsch. I mean, it isn't even close. They are clearly two different words. Unlike these:
That part of Europe has been known as Germania or similar for over 2000 years, various names have been used for various parts of it since then: I believe it has been (Bundesrepublik) Deutschland for less than a century.

But, almost all the major Italian city names are different in English: Milan, Naples, Florence, Rome, Genoa, Turin, Venice.
Similarly, Britain has been trading with that part of Europe for thousands of years. Italian has been only been spoken in much of it relatively recently. For instance the Romans used the name Florentiae (probably FLOR-EN-SEE-EYE) for we now call Florence in English: in Italian it is Firenze (FEER-EN-SI, with apologies to any native Italian speakers).
 
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  • #24
phyzguy
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Similar to name of people. "John" cannot become something else in another language.
Please don't tell that to anyone named Sean, Ian, Juan, Jan, Ivan, Johann or Giovanni.
 
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  • #25
fresh_42
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Please don't tell that to anyone named Sean, Ian, Juan, Jan, Ivan, Johann or Giovanni.
Although, I have never read Hans Wayne or Johannes Wayne somewhere.
 
  • #26
pbuk
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Although, I have never read Hans Wayne or Johannes Wayne somewhere.
Another great example of linguistic differences: the German word irgendwo translates as either "somewhere" or "anywhere". You picked the wrong one :biggrin:

Edit: shouldn't it be nirgendwo? This usually translates to "nowhere" but here this is "never ... anywhere" (can also be "not anywhere" etc., but never "not somewhere" or "not nowhere" (which is a double negative)).
 
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  • #27
fresh_42
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Another great example of linguistic differences: the German word irgendwo translates as either "somewhere" or "anywhere". You picked the wrong one :biggrin:
The problem with those automatic spell and grammar checkers is that you become lazy. If there is nothing underlined in red then you forget to check it twice.
 
  • #28
Wrichik Basu
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Thanks for the replies, everyone. Learnt something new.

Anyway, I gave up Hamburg due to financial constraints. Not much hope anywhere. Will have to stick inside the country only.
 
  • #29
jtbell
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I have wondered why we say "Germany" in English when they say "Deutschland" in ... Deutsch. I mean, it isn't even close. They are clearly two different words.
It's because "Dutch-land" would be the Netherlands. Then again, here in the US "Dutch" often refers to Germans, anyway, as in the "Pennsylvania Dutch" or the "Dutch Fork" area of South Carolina. But then there are also places like New York City, the Hudson Valley, and southwest Michigan where "Dutch" really does refer to Netherlanders...
 
  • #30
fresh_42
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It's because "Dutch-land" would be the Netherlands. Then again, here in the US "Dutch" often refers to Germans, anyway, as in the "Pennsylvania Dutch" or the "Dutch Fork" area of South Carolina. But then there are also places like New York City, the Hudson Valley, and southwest Michigan where "Dutch" really does refer to Netherlanders...
Wikipedia said:
The term Deutschland has been used since the 15th century, but is attested in individual documents even earlier; in the Frankfurt translation of the Golden Bull (around 1365) it is called Dutschelant. The term deutsch derives from the Old High German thiutisk (West Franconian *Þeodisk, Germanic *þeudisk), which originally meant "belonging to the people" (Germanic *þeuðō, Old High German thiot[a] "people"). This word was primarily used to describe the vernacular of all speakers of a Germanic idiom in contrast to the Welsh of the neighboring Romance peoples, French or Italian, and also in contrast to the Latin of the Christian priests in the Germanic peoples' own area.

Allemagne comes from the Alamanni or Alemanni who were an ancient and early medieval population group that is assigned to the West Germanic culture. The people in northern Switzerland, southwest Germany, and also the French people across the Rhine in Alsace are still Alemanni (with very similar native languages)

525px-Alemanni_expansion.png


The meaning of the English word Germany is clear but imprecise. I mean German tribes include Scandinavia, central Europe, England, and meanwhile large parts of North America.

Germania and Repubblica Federale Tedesca is the Italian version. I couldn't figure out where tedesco comes from.
The Russians say Germania and Njemetski for German, which basically means mute because the Slavic people (neighbors, a minority) didn't understand them. Many geographic names in east Germany, including Berlin, are of Slavic origin.
The Hungarians basically use the same Slavic word for mute.
 
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  • #31
pinball1970
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The problem with those automatic spell and grammar checkers is that you become lazy. If there is nothing underlined in red then you forget to check it twice.
England in German in England as is Lancashire and Manchester. Thank you
 
  • #32
fresh_42
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England in German in England as is Lancashire and Manchester. Thank you
Well, yes, I guess. But the ultimate test is Worcestershire sauce!
 
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  • #33
pinball1970
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Well, yes, I guess. But the ultimate test is Worcestershire sauce!
The German removes the part we do not actually say!

Worcestersauce!
 
  • #34
PeroK
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England in German in England as is Lancashire and Manchester. Thank you
I remember that in German all rivers are either masculine or feminine. This applies not only to German rivers ( der Rhein, die Oder) but to others as well. It's die Themse and der Mississippi, for example.
 
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  • #35
Wrichik Basu
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I doubt that India is the correct name in Hindi. Isn't it already translated?
Yes, you are right. India is not "India" in Hindi. But at the same time, all Indian university have admission forms primarily in English. Even if they have a Hindi or regional language version, the names of all countries will be phonetically translated. So, Germany will become "जर्मनी" but pronounce the same as the English name. I was a bit surprised that even though Hamburg admits international students, all but one page is in German, which doesn't seem fair.
 

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