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Can someone explain this to me

  1. Feb 16, 2010 #1
    Say you have an equation like this.

    Xcos17 + Xsin17 = 600

    If I want to solve for X, I know that I can divide by cos17 + sin17.

    So it ends up being X = 600/(cos17 + sin17).

    However, why is it that it becomes just one X on the left side? There are two X's and dividing by cos17 + sin17 does not cancel the other X so why is it that only one X stays?
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 16, 2010 #2
    You can treat those two as only one, remember distributivity?
  4. Feb 16, 2010 #3

    I can't believe I didn't even realize that. Thanks for the help.
  5. Feb 16, 2010 #4
    You're welcome.
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