Can you do a PhD in maths with 2.1?

  • #26
No. 3.5 (on the usual 4 scale) is typically half-way between a B and an A. The numerical value of an A,B,C,D,E varies depending on the school, but the lowest estimate of a B that I've seen would be ~75%. So figure halfway between a B and an A would be around 87%.
That's nonsense. About 30% get top grade in Maths. Very little get 87% on average.

I'm on a another student forum, but the top grade in UK is first which is 70% or more. Only 30% get a first.

What percentage of US student get an A? I bet it isn't less than 5%. Which you are implying if you think halfway between a B and an A is 87%.

P.S. Another thing is US students are a year behind UK students.
 
  • #27
gb7nash
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I'm on a another student forum, but the top grade in UK is first which is 70% or more. Only 30% get a first.
This is a lot less strict than the US. I've never seen the highest grade (A) being equivalent to +70%.

What percentage of US student get an A? I bet it isn't less than 5%. Which you are implying if you think halfway between a B and an A is 87%.
It depends on the class. Some classes in the US are governed by curves, some aren't.
 
  • #28
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No. 3.5 (on the usual 4 scale) is typically half-way between a B and an A.
Well, that is how it is in the US (where I am), though actually my school has a +/- systems where you have to get a 93 or higher for an A and an 83 or higher to get a B etc.

The numerical value of an A,B,C,D,E varies depending on the school, but the lowest estimate of a B that I've seen would be ~75%. So figure halfway between a B and an A would be around 87%.
Well, that isn't what any of the sources I found say:
McGill's conversionhttps://secureweb.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/sites/mcgill.ca.gradapplicants/files/UNITED_KINGDOM.pdf" [Broken]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_undergraduate_degree_classification#International_comparisons"

It appears that this is roughly in line with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Mark_Scheme" [Broken]

Of course, if you're British you would know better than I.
 
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  • #29
gb7nash
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Well, that is how it is in the US (where I am), though actually my school has a +/- systems where you have to get a 93 or higher for an A and an 83 or higher to get a B etc.



Well, that isn't what any of the sources I found say:
McGill's conversionhttps://secureweb.mcgill.ca/gradapplicants/sites/mcgill.ca.gradapplicants/files/UNITED_KINGDOM.pdf" [Broken]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_undergraduate_degree_classification#International_comparisons"

It appears that this is roughly in line with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Mark_Scheme" [Broken]

Of course, if you're British you would know better than I.
Sorry, I think I misunderstood the question. I'm strictly talking about in the US. I have no idea of how it works in the UK.
 
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  • #30
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For Canadian-to-Canadian school conversion, this is the best source:

http://careers.mcmaster.ca/students/education-planning/virtual-resources/gpa-conversion-chart [Broken]

This is what I've always thought GPA-to-percent conversion was around, with respect to some error and approximation. Each school usually holds standard to one of those 10 grading scales, and all of those can be converted to a GPA.

I hope this isn't too far off conversion to American schools.

Also, the reason the scales differ a bit between Canada-US-UK, is we have different 'failing' grades. I know in Canada, its 50% to pass a class, but I believe in the states its 50-59% is an F, so I would assume that 60% would be passing for them.
 
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  • #31
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This is a lot less strict than the US. I've never seen the highest grade (A) being equivalent to +70%.
Don't be fooled into thinking percentage grades can be compared between countries. It is all how the tests are written. Getting in the high 90's in North America is common, it is almost impossible in the UK University system as I experienced it.
 
  • #32
cjl
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This is a lot less strict than the US. I've never seen the highest grade (A) being equivalent to +70%.
That depends heavily on the class. I've gotten an A with a 58% before. Some classes are heavily curved, some are not.
 
  • #33
gb7nash
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That depends heavily on the class. I've gotten an A with a 58% before. Some classes are heavily curved, some are not.
Of course. I'm assuming classes with no curve. For the other case, I've seen people completely bomb a final exam (relatively difficult for the class) and obtain an A in a class. For a lot of bell curve classes, as long as you stay ahead of the pack, you're in the clear. What percentage this is strongly depends on how everyone does.
 
  • #34
PAllen
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Of course. I'm assuming classes with no curve. For the other case, I've seen people completely bomb a final exam (relatively difficult for the class) and obtain an A in a class. For a lot of bell curve classes, as long as you stay ahead of the pack, you're in the clear. What percentage this is strongly depends on how everyone does.
I remember a class where the teacher was experimenting teaching general measure theory to freshman with no background beyond AP calculus. 30% was an A; 55% was the second highest grade in class (this was Ivy league school). At least when I was in school, it was all up to professor in private schools, no one else had any say.
 
  • #35
Is it better to study 1 area of Maths. As I could study, a mix between algebra, logic and analysis this year.

However, I can just do algebra this year and then logic the next.

Like I was thinking what I study either looks like this

project
Group theory
Topology
Algebraic topology
Algebraic geometry
commutative algebra
lie algebra.

Or it could look like this

fourier analysis
complex analysis
matrix analysis
intro to topology
group theory

Linear analysis
Analytical number theory
Lie algebra
AT
AG
commutative algebra.

(note the first one has less courses as they would be techniquely fourth year topic instead of third year).

I feel I could get a higher score just studying algebra, then just studying logic at fourth year.

Don't know what to do?
 

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