Capacitance needed to stabilize a voltage pulse

In summary, the conversation is discussing the value of a capacitor needed to stabilize a 6mV pulse voltage in order to power a small LED. The person asking the question has a bridge rectifier but is uncertain about the value of the capacitor needed. It is mentioned that a 6V pulse was discussed in a previous thread, and the frustration of continuously starting new threads on the same topic is expressed.
  • #1
Daniel Floyd
21
0
ok i need to know the value of the capacitor which i need.

i have a pulse voltage of 6mV which i want to stabilise to create a voltage which will power a small L.E.D. i currently have a bridge rectifier and i know i need a capacitor but what would the value of this capacitor be.
 
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  • #2


6mV isn't going to power a LED... LED's are current driven ... ie. you need a constant current at a given voltage the common 5mm diameter LEDs require ~ 20mA

you had better expand a bit on where your 6mV is coming from
you are really going to need a few volts or so

Dave
 
  • #3


Daniel Floyd said:
ok i need to know the value of the capacitor which i need.

i have a pulse voltage of 6mV which i want to stabilise to create a voltage which will power a small L.E.D. i currently have a bridge rectifier and i know i need a capacitor but what would the value of this capacitor be.

Maybe he means 6V pulse like in his old thread?

https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=622069

.
 
  • #4
  • #5


The capacitance needed to stabilize a voltage pulse depends on several factors such as the frequency and duration of the pulse, the load resistance, and the desired level of stabilization. In order to determine the appropriate value of the capacitor, it is important to calculate the time constant of the circuit, which is the product of the capacitance and the load resistance. This time constant should be at least 5 times larger than the duration of the pulse in order to effectively stabilize the voltage.

For a pulse voltage of 6mV and an LED load, a small value capacitor in the range of microfarads (µF) or even picofarads (pF) may be sufficient. However, it is recommended to perform further calculations or simulations to determine the exact value of the capacitor needed for your specific circuit.

Additionally, the type and quality of the capacitor can also affect its performance in stabilizing the voltage pulse. It is important to choose a capacitor with low equivalent series resistance (ESR) and high capacitance stability to ensure proper stabilization.

In conclusion, the value of the capacitor needed to stabilize a voltage pulse depends on various factors and should be carefully calculated or simulated to ensure optimal performance in powering your LED.
 

1. What is capacitance and how does it relate to voltage pulse stabilization?

Capacitance is the ability of a material or system to store an electric charge. In the context of voltage pulse stabilization, capacitance is used to store and release electrical energy in order to maintain a steady voltage level.

2. How does the amount of capacitance needed to stabilize a voltage pulse vary?

The amount of capacitance needed to stabilize a voltage pulse depends on several factors, including the frequency and amplitude of the pulse, the load resistance, and the desired stabilization time. In general, a larger capacitance value will result in a slower stabilization time.

3. Can any type of capacitor be used for voltage pulse stabilization?

Yes, any type of capacitor can be used for voltage pulse stabilization as long as it meets the necessary capacitance and voltage rating requirements. However, certain types of capacitors, such as ceramic and film capacitors, are more commonly used for this purpose due to their stability and reliability.

4. How does the placement of the capacitor affect its effectiveness in stabilizing a voltage pulse?

The placement of the capacitor in a circuit can significantly impact its effectiveness in stabilizing a voltage pulse. Placing the capacitor closer to the load can result in faster stabilization times, while placing it further away can lead to slower stabilization times and potential voltage fluctuations.

5. Are there any potential drawbacks to using capacitance for voltage pulse stabilization?

One potential drawback of using capacitance for voltage pulse stabilization is the possibility of overshoot or ringing, which can occur when the capacitance value is too high or the resistance is too low. Additionally, capacitors can also introduce noise into the circuit, which may affect the performance of sensitive components.

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