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Carbon Dioxide emissions question

  1. Feb 8, 2010 #1
    I've been wondering recently about the air quality in cities. Suppose all cars/transport methods were to go electric or clean (electric cars etc...) how much would air quality improve by? In other words what % of the nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions are mobile sources responsible for? I've been trying to look this up but can't seem to get a consistant number. Any help in clearing this issue would be appreciated.

    - Necross
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 8, 2010 #2


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    It depends on the area.
    In most cities mobile sources are the source of most pollution, overall (for most countries) they are less than fixed sources - power stations/factories.
    Your local government, city/municipality/state probably publishes local figures for their standards from local mobile/fixed sources.

    You also have to consider the actual effects - smog from traffic exhausts emitted at street level in LA in summer has a bigger effect on the people than the same mass of the same chemicals emitted from a power station stack in the middle of nowhere.

    If you are in the USA, start here http://www.epa.gov/oar/data/index.html
  4. Feb 8, 2010 #3

    Doug Huffman

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    mgb_phys provided a fine static analysis.

    The overall air quality might marginally improve for the higher quality emissions from power plants, but their total emissions would increase, with a constant pollutant fraction, as they pick-up the otherwise distributed transportation power demand.

    For transmission efficiency, power plants are not far removed from major loads like cities.

    NIMBY isn't good enough. Nuclear power is secure power.
  5. Feb 21, 2010 #4
    I agree with Doug Huffman's view.......
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