Cell cryoperservation with DMSO

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In summary, the use of DMSO in cell research has been shown to prevent cell damage by relieving osmotic stress and preventing the formation of ice crystals. However, it does not completely replace water in the cell as some sources have suggested. Further research is needed to fully understand the mechanism of action of DMSO in cell membranes.
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HappMatt
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So my question is this does DMSO as someone in the lab I am working at says "it replaces the water in the cell" is that true??

From what I have read in journals a couple of journal articles they never said anything about it replacing the water. It did talk about thinning of the bilayer and at certain concentrations starting to form transient holes in the bi layer and even destroying the membrane at high enough concentrations. I was under the assumption that the DMSO helps prevent cell damage by helping relive osmotic stress and helping the water not to form crystals that damage the membrane. I'm guessing there is more to it than that but the idea that it totally replaces the water I wasn't to sure about and have yet to find a definitive answer.
 
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My understanding is that DMSO prevents the nucleation of ice crystals. It does not "replace" water.
 
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I can say that the statement "DMSO replaces the water in the cell" is not entirely accurate. DMSO, or dimethyl sulfoxide, is a commonly used cryoprotectant in cell cryopreservation. Its main function is to prevent ice crystal formation within the cell, which can cause damage to the cell membrane and other cellular structures. DMSO acts as a cryoprotectant by penetrating the cell membrane and replacing some of the water molecules, which helps to prevent the formation of ice crystals.

However, it is important to note that DMSO does not completely replace all of the water in the cell. The cell still needs a certain amount of water to maintain its structure and function. In fact, using too much DMSO can be harmful to the cell as it can disrupt the cell's osmotic balance and potentially cause damage.

Additionally, DMSO also has other effects on the cell membrane, such as thinning the bilayer and potentially causing transient holes or even membrane damage at high concentrations. These effects can also contribute to the overall protection of the cell during cryopreservation.

In summary, while DMSO does play a crucial role in preventing ice crystal formation and protecting the cell during cryopreservation, it does not completely replace the water in the cell. It is important to carefully control the concentration of DMSO used and consider its effects on the cell membrane in order to successfully preserve cells for future use.
 

Related to Cell cryoperservation with DMSO

1. What is cell cryopreservation with DMSO?

Cell cryopreservation with DMSO is a method used to preserve cells at very low temperatures, typically -80°C or colder. DMSO, or dimethyl sulfoxide, is added to the cell culture to protect the cells from damage during the freezing process.

2. Why is DMSO used in cell cryopreservation?

DMSO is a cryoprotectant, meaning it helps protect the cells from damage caused by the freezing process. It does this by preventing the formation of ice crystals, which can damage the cell membrane and organelles.

3. How does cell cryopreservation with DMSO work?

In cell cryopreservation with DMSO, the cells are first suspended in a solution containing DMSO and a cryoprotective medium, such as fetal bovine serum. The cells are then slowly cooled to a very low temperature, usually using a controlled rate freezer, and stored in liquid nitrogen for long-term preservation.

4. What types of cells can be cryopreserved with DMSO?

Most types of cells can be cryopreserved with DMSO, including mammalian cells, plant cells, and microbial cells. However, some cells may be more sensitive to DMSO and require alternative cryopreservation methods.

5. Are there any risks or side effects of using DMSO in cell cryopreservation?

While DMSO is generally considered safe for use in cell cryopreservation, it can have toxic effects on some cell types. In addition, DMSO can sometimes alter the behavior or characteristics of cells, so it is important to carefully select the appropriate concentration and method of DMSO usage for each cell type.

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