Chem Eng student, scored 990 on GRE Physics

In summary, the person is discussing their academic background, specifically their achievements in A level and AS level Physics. They regret not studying more for their A level in Physics and want to prove their capabilities by mentioning their high score on the GRE Physics subject test in their resume or LinkedIn. However, it is debated whether test scores hold much weight in the hiring process, with some believing it is an indication of work ethic. The person also mentions their experience as a hiring manager and the focus on specific skills and work ethic rather than test scores. They conclude by stating that including their GRE score on their resume or LinkedIn wouldn't hurt and could potentially be beneficial in certain job applications.
  • #1
Hi, so I am from the UK, and we do a levels at school. I had four A levels at A grade (pretty average, hard workers can get A*) and an A at AS physics but my overall A level in Physics was B (I fast tracked the 2 year course in one during my gap year after school). I only needed Bio, Chem and Maths at A for uni so didn't bother studying for Physics that much. Now I regret so much for getting that B, it's always in the back of my head. So I took a GRE Physics subject test which is not even used that much in the UK and probably recognised even less so my employers. I got the highest score though. Do you think I can mention this in my resume or LinkedIn. I have only "cashed in" my AS Physics grade so nobody knows I actually have a B but still I want to prove to the world that I am capable of doing well at Physics. Do you think GRE Physics test can be used a qualification to show to employers? Thanks and please be nice about the B.
 
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  • #2
I don't think prospective employers are particularly impressed by test scores.
 
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Likes CWatters
  • #3
As a hiring manager I never once asked any candidate about test scores, or even grades for that matter. I was far more interested in specific skills and work ethic.
 
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  • #4
Many schools in my area don't even let you study 4 A levels. They do 3 and a personal project.

I suspect most employers won't know the difference between A and AS levels. In a recent study 25% of employers thought that a 1 was the top grade in the 1-9 GCSE grading system, where actually a 9 is the top mark!

Once you have a degree nobody will care what grade you got at A level. I've recruited graduate electronic engineers and we only ever care about their degrees and possibly what units they took at university. Relevant experience counts for a lot as well, even if it's just a home project or summer job. An ability to solve problems or work on their own initiative was also sought after.
 
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  • #5
It doesn't hurt to include all your accomplishments on your resume, or mention it on LinkedIn. Especially as impressive a score as a 990 on the Physics GRE!
 
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  • #6
Yes, why not include it. Maybe no one will see it or ask about it, but why not. If you were applying for some kind of physics tutoring job or related thing that would definitely help. I considered applying for a GRE prep position, and obviously they asked for my GRE scores.
 
  • #7
Vanadium 50 said:
I don't think prospective employers are particularly impressed by test scores.

Dale said:
As a hiring manager I never once asked any candidate about test scores, or even grades for that matter. I was far more interested in specific skills and work ethic.

When I'm on a hiring committee, I've always taken a peek at grades and test scores, because I regard them as an available proxy for work ethic. Of course, they're not a perfect proxy, but they are hard data and in the hiring process, there are not usually any perfect proxies for work ethic.

Especially when hiring teachers, my concern is that candidates with weaker grades and test scores will be more likely to give students a pass on not doing their work. Once they become teachers, people who had higher standards for themselves as students will be more likely to maintain higher standards for their own students.

Close colleagues and I have also know a number of teachers and engineers in our careers who have not really had a great command of the very subjects they needed to do their jobs. It is very common to see high school teachers lacking knowledge of assigned chemistry, math, and physics courses.

I've even begun to be suspicious of resumes and CVs that do not list a GPA in their education sections. I've noticed a distinct trend that higher GPAs tend to be listed on CVs and resumes more often than low GPAs, so I make sure to make sure the file is complete with transcripts (always required for teaching jobs) before recommending a candidate make it to the interview stage. I also read all the essays, recommendation letters, and gather whatever additional info I can from professional networking sites (Research Gate, Linked In, Google Scholar, etc.)
 
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  • #8
Dr. Courtney said:
Of course, they're not a perfect proxy, but they are hard data and in the hiring process, there are not usually any perfect proxies for work ethic.
Luckily, the community that I work in is fairly small, and I have a good chance of knowing someone who worked directly with most candidates. So I ask previous colleagues or managers about work ethic.

It is not a process that can be replicated in larger communities, but in my situation it gets me the information I most want.
 
  • #9
Dale said:
Luckily, the community that I work in is fairly small, and I have a good chance of knowing someone who worked directly with most candidates. So I ask previous colleagues or managers about work ethic.

It is not a process that can be replicated in larger communities, but in my situation it gets me the information I most want.

That makes sense. HR policies vary widely. In some places where I've served on hiring committees, we were limited by HR policy to only contacting the references listed by the applicant on their application materials. These tend to be cherry picked by the applicant to be folks more likely to present a positive perspective. I always want the most data possible when making hiring decisions, and I've never seen or heard of an HR policy preventing asking for and considering transcripts and standardized test score reports.
 
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  • #10
How did you do it!
 
  • #11
Maybe it's just me, but if I saw a Physics GRE score on a Chemical Engineer's resume, I'd think that this person isn't terribly interested in Chemical Engineering, but wishes he or she was going to grad school for physics instead of working for me.
 

1. How did you prepare for the GRE Physics exam?

I prepared for the GRE Physics exam by studying the core concepts and theories in physics, practicing with sample questions and exams, and reviewing any weak areas. I also utilized study materials and resources such as prep books and online practice tests.

2. What tips do you have for scoring well on the GRE Physics exam?

Some tips for scoring well on the GRE Physics exam include understanding the test format and content, practicing with timed practice tests, and focusing on areas that you struggle with. It is also important to manage your time effectively during the exam and to carefully read and analyze each question.

3. How did your background in Chemical Engineering help you on the GRE Physics exam?

My background in Chemical Engineering provided me with a strong foundation in physics, which helped me to understand and apply the concepts on the GRE Physics exam. Additionally, my experience with problem-solving and critical thinking skills from my program also proved to be beneficial on the exam.

4. What resources did you find most helpful for studying for the GRE Physics exam?

I found using practice tests and questions from official GRE study materials to be the most helpful resources for studying. I also found online resources and study groups to be useful for reviewing and clarifying any difficult concepts.

5. How did scoring a 990 on the GRE Physics exam impact your graduate school applications?

Scoring a 990 on the GRE Physics exam helped to strengthen my graduate school applications and demonstrate my proficiency in the subject. It also opened up opportunities for scholarships and other forms of financial aid. However, it is important to note that admissions committees also consider other factors such as research experience, letters of recommendation, and personal statements in the application process.

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