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Classical Cheng's or Lorrain/Corson's Electromagnetics book?

  1. David Cheng's "Field and Wave Electromagnetics"

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  2. P.Lorrain and Corson's "Electromagnetic Fields and Waves"

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  3. Other(explain)

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  1. Oct 24, 2015 #1
    Hello, I want a book on electromagnetics for my second course on electromagnetism. In my first course we used Griffith's "Introduction to Electrodynamics" with supplements like Morin and Purcell's "Electricity and Magnetism". I borrowed those from the university's library but now I want to step up my level and go for something just a bit more advanced(not graduate level though). After some research, I have narrowed it down to the two following choices:
    Cheng's "Field and Wave Electromagnetics"
    Lorrain and Corson's "Electromagnetic Fields and Waves"
    So, which one do you think is the better of the two?
    Also, if you have any other suggestion, please feel free to express it(except Griffith's and Morin/Purcell's books)!
    Thank you in advance!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2015 #2

    vanhees71

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    Landau&Lifshitz Vol. II
    Schwinger, Classical Electrodynamics
    Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics
     
  4. Oct 24, 2015 #3
    Ain't Jackson's and Landau's books at graduate level?
     
  5. Oct 24, 2015 #4

    vanhees71

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    Well, but if you've been through Griffiths and you want to go beyond that level, they seem to be good. Of course, you should first check at the library, whether you like them or find them useful before you buy them.
     
  6. Oct 24, 2015 #5
    You got me wrong. The professor teaches at a level similar to that of Griffith's. But I want to study the same material at just a bit more advance level. Just a bit. Not all the way up to graduate level! I am thinking about a book that goes just a bit more deep than Griffiths as far as mathematics go and also that also treats some more subtle subjects that might not be found at a book like Griffith's. Maybe the way I had put it give the wrong impression
     
  7. Oct 24, 2015 #6

    vanhees71

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    Then perhaps have a look at the Feynman Lectures vol. II.
     
  8. Oct 24, 2015 #7
    Is it more advanced than Griffiths?
     
  9. Oct 24, 2015 #8

    vanhees71

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    I'd say, it's one of the best books ever written about physics.
     
  10. Oct 24, 2015 #9

    jasonRF

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    The two books you mention are at the same level as Griffiths. I am most familiar with Cheng's book. It has a different emphasis than Griffiths - spending a few chapters on transmission lines, impedance matching, waveguides and basic antennas, but is no more advanced. Cheng's book will help prepare for learning about microwave engineering and such, but will be any additional help for more advanced material. I'm only a little familiar with Lorrain and Corson - again it is similar to Griffiths with a slightly different coverage (and more interesting problems!).

    One book that is in-between Griffiths and graduate level may be Marion and Heald
    http://store.doverpublications.com/0486490602.html
    Note that the solutions manual is also available from that page, so it may be nice for self-study. See if your library has it to see if it is what you are looking for.

    jason
     
  11. Oct 24, 2015 #10

    jasonRF

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  12. Oct 24, 2015 #11
    I will certainly check it out! thank you!
    Marion/Heald's book seems very good!


    By the way, does any of you know Zangwill's Modern Electrodynamics?
     
  13. Oct 25, 2015 #12

    vanhees71

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    I've looked through it. It seems to be a good book, but I don't understand what's "modern" about it. A really "modern" book is more like Landau/Lifshitz, Scheck, or Schwartz, where E&M is treated as a relativistic theory, which it is right from the beginning 150 years ago but which was only realized by Poincare, Lorentz, and finally Einstein around 110 years ago.
     
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