Coefficient of Friction of a hockey puck

In summary: Give us an example.In summary, the hockey puck experiences a downward force (weight) due to gravity on the ice, which is in turn proportional to the mass of the puck. The force of friction between the puck and the ice is determined by the normal force, which is the mass times gravity.
  • #1
panvietboy
4
0
Hi I am having problem with this homework problem dealing with the coefficient of friction.

A hockey puck having a mass of 0.3kg is slid across the ice, starting with a speed of 12 m/s and slowing to 11.3 m/s after traveling for 3 sec. What is the coefficient of friction between the puck and the ice?

I don't even know where to start, can you guys help me please?
 
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  • #2
first,you must know the formula: F=uN

you can find out the puck N with its mass;

and find out its acceleration,

so can you afford it now?
 
  • #3
wait I am still kind of slow on this what's the first thing you should do?
 
  • #4
Starting with a speed of 12 m/s and slowing to 11.3 m/s after traveling for 3 sec, determine the deceleration. Assume it is constant.


The puck has mass m=0.3kg, which experiences a downward force (weight) due to gravity on the ice of mg, where g is the acceleration due to gravity, 9.81 m/s2.

Friction is proportional to the weight, and the proportionality constant is mu, the coefficient of friction. Refer to enricfemi's post.

Also, please review one's class notes and textbook.

This is also a good reference -

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/N2st.html

Eventually one should prove a = mu * g, this type of problem.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Hi panvietboy! Welcome to PF! :smile:

Use Newton's second law:
force = rate of change of momentum.

What is the momentum? How much did it change? How long did it take to change?

That gives you the force.

Do you know how to work out the coefficient of friction then, from the force and the mass?
 
  • #6
so first I would find the normal force which in this case is the mass times gravity.
N=mg---> N=(0.3kg)(9.81) = 2.943 then after I get this what do i do next
 
  • #7
panvietboy said:
so first I would find the normal force which in this case is the mass times gravity.
N=mg---> N=(0.3kg)(9.81) = 2.943 then after I get this what do i do next

Then you have to find the friction force, for which you ask yourself:
tiny-tim said:
What is the momentum? How much did it change? How long did it take to change?

That gives you the force.
 
  • #8
im still having trouble figuring out how to find the force. I don't get the equation I should use.
 
  • #9
panvietboy said:
im still having trouble figuring out how to find the force. I don't get the equation I should use.

Do it one step at a time, and show us your answers …

What is the intial momentum?

What is the final momentum?

:smile:
 
  • #10
panvietboy said:
im still having trouble figuring out how to find the force. I don't get the equation I should use.

Think about it step by step. You know the final and initial velocity right? You know how long it took to get from the initial velocity to the final velocity, so what equation do you think you need to use? What do you need to solve for? How does this relate to the force of friction? What is a force defined as?
 

Related to Coefficient of Friction of a hockey puck

1. What is the coefficient of friction of a hockey puck?

The coefficient of friction of a hockey puck is a measure of the amount of resistance or friction between the puck and the surface it is moving on. It is represented by the symbol mu (μ) and is a unitless number that ranges from 0 to 1.

2. How is the coefficient of friction of a hockey puck determined?

The coefficient of friction of a hockey puck is determined by conducting experiments in which the puck is moved across different surfaces at different speeds. The force required to keep the puck moving at a constant speed is measured and used to calculate the coefficient of friction.

3. What factors affect the coefficient of friction of a hockey puck?

The coefficient of friction of a hockey puck can be affected by various factors, such as the surface it is moving on, the temperature, the type of ice, and the material of the puck itself. Rougher surfaces and higher temperatures generally result in a higher coefficient of friction.

4. Why is the coefficient of friction of a hockey puck important?

The coefficient of friction of a hockey puck is important because it affects the movement and control of the puck on the ice. A higher coefficient of friction can make the puck harder to move and control, while a lower coefficient of friction can result in the puck sliding too easily and making it difficult to stop or change direction.

5. Can the coefficient of friction of a hockey puck be changed?

Yes, the coefficient of friction of a hockey puck can be changed by altering the surface it is moving on or by using different materials for the puck. For example, a smoother ice surface or a puck made of a different material can result in a different coefficient of friction.

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