Coefficient of Friction of a wooden box

In summary, an equation can be derived for uk, us, Ff, and N by using the equation N=mg-F(sin(theta)) for N, Ff=F(cos(theta)) for Ff, and F=ukN or F=usN for uk and us, respectively. These equations can be used to find the relation between the force of friction and uk or us.
  • #1
goj2
3
0
1. If a wooden box was pulled up the inclined plane at a constant speed using a spring scale. How would an equation be derived for uk, us, Ff, and N.


Homework Equations


So to get N. The equation would be N=mg-F (sin (theta)).
with F being the reading on the spring scale.
Ff would be the opposite of the pulling force F, from what is read in the spring scale.
So when pulling upward (tan (thetha)) is not used to find uk or us.
So I need help because I don't know wat the equation would be for Uk or Us. And if I am deriving N or Ff the right way.

The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
It appears that the only thing you need now is the relation between the force of friction Ff and uk (or us).
 
  • #3
Is this right?

If F=ukN
with F being the reading on the spring scale when the box is being pulled at constant speed

F=usN
with F being the reading on the spring scale when the box starts to move.
 
  • #4
goj2 said:
Is this right?

If F=ukN
with F being the reading on the spring scale when the box is being pulled at constant speed

F=usN
with F being the reading on the spring scale when the box starts to move.

Since you stated that the force makes an angle other than zero with the incline, then the force of friction (static/kinetic) equals F*cos(theta), where theta is the angle between the force and the incline, and F is the reading on the scale. Plug thta into the equations above, combine with the expression you got for N, and you should get your relation.
 

Related to Coefficient of Friction of a wooden box

What is the coefficient of friction?

The coefficient of friction is a measure of the resistance to sliding between two surfaces. It is a dimensionless number that indicates how rough or smooth the surfaces are in contact with each other. A higher coefficient of friction means that there is more resistance to sliding, while a lower coefficient of friction means that there is less resistance to sliding.

How is the coefficient of friction determined for a wooden box?

The coefficient of friction for a wooden box is typically determined through experimentation. A common method is to place the box on a flat surface and gradually increase the incline until the box begins to slide. The angle of the incline at which the box starts to slide is then used to calculate the coefficient of friction.

What factors can affect the coefficient of friction of a wooden box?

There are several factors that can affect the coefficient of friction of a wooden box. These include the type of wood used, the surface texture of the box, the weight of the box, and the surface it is in contact with. Other factors such as temperature, humidity, and the presence of any lubricants can also impact the coefficient of friction.

Why is the coefficient of friction important for a wooden box?

The coefficient of friction is important for a wooden box because it affects how easily the box can be moved or transported. A higher coefficient of friction can make it more difficult to slide the box across a surface, while a lower coefficient of friction can make it easier to move the box. Understanding the coefficient of friction can also help in determining the best way to package and transport the box.

Can the coefficient of friction be changed for a wooden box?

Yes, the coefficient of friction for a wooden box can be changed through various methods. For example, applying a lubricant or changing the surface texture of the box can alter the coefficient of friction. Additionally, using different materials for the box or the surface it is in contact with can also affect the coefficient of friction.

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