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Companies that hire Math majors (Mathematicians)? Does Google hire Mat

  1. Dec 24, 2013 #1
    What are some companies that higher Mathematicans? Does Google hire Mathematicians?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 24, 2013 #2

    Zondrina

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    If you're not planning to be a professor or do research, the job prospects are mostly bleak for mathematicians (sadly).
     
  4. Dec 24, 2013 #3
    Very few private companies hire mathematicians. Lots of private companies hire individuals with a mathematical background and a set of skills they find valuable.

    Math is a bit like bread. Not a big demand for plain math, but it can be the foundation for lots of careers in demand.

    You'll have to add a lot more details to get much in the way of specifics.
     
  5. Dec 25, 2013 #4
    Banks hire math majors
     
  6. Dec 25, 2013 #5

    esuna

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    Math majors/masters always score high on Forbes' "best college majors" "best masters degree" lists but they never say where they get hired or anything.
     
  7. Dec 25, 2013 #6

    StatGuy2000

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    That is not true. There is a high demand for math majors, particularly those with a background in statistics, to work in areas such as data mining, data analysis, and statistical analysis in a wide variety of firms e.g. market research analysis, banks and other financial institutions, pharmaceutical/biotech companies, etc.

    Many math majors who also double major in computer science (the two degrees often go hand-to-hand) often work in the high-tech sector as computer programmers/software engineers. It's also quite common for math majors to double major in economics or accounting, and many of those often find employment in accounting or consulting firms. Having a major in math is also a good preparation to pursue the actuarial field, especially if you have passed at least some of the actuarial exams (although if I'm not mistaken, Locrian has posted that the entry-level actuarial job market is fairly saturated).

    And to answer the OP, yes, Google does hire many math majors (often those with MS or PhD in math).
     
  8. Dec 25, 2013 #7

    Zondrina

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    The OP's question is very general and does not clarify whether or not he/she intends to pursue statistics or stick to mathematics. I'm assuming mathematics and statistics are separate as career choices (even though they are the same educationally).

    There definitely isn't a high demand for mathematics majors in particular. Most mathematicians are going to find themselves without a job these days and it's not because they aren't intelligent. Pursuing statistics and actuarial science would be a much better choice if you're looking to pay the bills at the end of the day.
     
  9. Dec 25, 2013 #8

    StatGuy2000

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    I question your assertion that "most mathematicians are going to find themselves without a job these days." On what basis are you making this assertion? Do you have relevant statistics or data to back up your assertion?

    I agree that the OP's question is very general and doesn't clarify whether or not he/she intends to pursue statistics. On the other hand, I think you are being far too restrictive in terms of mathematics being a career choice.

    If you do a search in online job forums like Workopolis, Monster, Indeed, etc., you aren't likely to find too many jobs with the exact job title "mathematician" (which I suspect you may be thinking of). However, if you dig deeper there are many jobs out there which require quantitative abilities and it is in these types of roles where math majors have found employment, especially math majors who double major or minor in fields such as economics, accounting or computer science, or pursue additional studies or specialization in statistics (it's also worth keeping in mind that in many schools in both Canada and the US, statistics courses are taught within the math department, so to train as a statistician you would in effect be pursuing a math major).
     
  10. Dec 25, 2013 #9
    Thank you very much for your replies! I would be double majoring in Math and Computer Engineering. I would then go on to get my Masters, and PhD in Mathematics (I believe in the Applied Mathematics area but I'm not sure what I would focus on, but I don't think it would be Satistics).
     
  11. Dec 25, 2013 #10

    Zondrina

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    You really need to focus on the computer aspects of your double degree then as they are more than likely going to be what net you a job at the end of the day. Take that from me; I was personally enrolled in an honors double major in computer science & mathematics degree for almost 3 years (I've switched into electrical engineering since then). The mathematics is a hobby in comparison, no one really cares much for it in the industry unless you're good with statistics & data.
     
  12. Dec 25, 2013 #11
    I don't think you two are talking about the same thing, and I think both posts are reasonably true.

    As far as I'm concerned, a mathematician is someone who studies novel areas of mathematics for a living. This is a definition I've encountered in literature and among professors. It's narrow, but I think it's right.

    Given that definition, almost no one with a BS or even MS in math is actually a mathematician (grad students excluded). The majority of PhD's in statistics are not mathematicians. Grocery store cashiers, actuaries and statisticians all apply mathematics in their jobs, but just about none of them are mathematicians.

    Almost everyone I worked at in my last job and my current job have degrees in math. None of them are mathematicians, all are employed in industry, and all have excellent job prospects.
     
  13. Dec 27, 2013 #12

    StatGuy2000

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    As I've stated above in my earlier post, if we define a mathematician using the narrow definition of someone who studies novel areas of mathematics for a living, most likely in academia or in similar research settings, then the job prospects are limited (although had asked whether Google hires mathematicians i.e. those who have PhDs in math, and the answer to that question is yes -- there not be many openings, but there certainly are some openings).

    However, the impression I was getting from the OP was that he/she was wondering what are the job prospects for those who major in math or who complete graduate studies in math. In that broader context, math majors have excellent job prospects (with the caveat of what specific skill sets they have acquired).
     
  14. Dec 27, 2013 #13

    Zondrina

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    I ran a search for that; The prospects are hopeless on a good day.
     
  15. Dec 28, 2013 #14

    StatGuy2000

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    Well I never said it was easy to get a position at Google, just that Google hires mathematicians.
     
  16. Dec 28, 2013 #15
    There are plenty of companies that hire people with high level math skills. eg professional statisticians.

    There are more openings in ancillary professions eg software development, software optimisation, data science. Here you use math skills all the time but they are not strictly mats jobs.

    Companies like Amazon hire mathematicians to work out that they can have an inventory of million of items, some only sold a few times per year, and still make a profit. The optimisation problem is how to select and price these items.
    https://www.amazon.com/The-Long-Tail-Business-Selling/dp/B001Q9E9F6
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  17. Jan 11, 2014 #16
    As far as actual Mathematicians, I'm not sure.

    I am a software engineer with a Math degree. It was not tremendously hard for me to get a good job out of college but probably not as easy as it would have been with a degree in Computer Science or Accounting or something. I got a lot of interviews though. I also had a minor in Computer Science. Most Math majors that I know minored in something like CS, Economics, Finance etc.

    A couple of possible career paths: Software Engineer, Quantitative Analyst, Actuary
     
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