1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Comparison of two Thermal Physics Books

  1. Aug 17, 2009 #1

    a_h

    User Avatar

    Hello everyone!

    I am taking my Physics Ph. D. Qualifier on Friday and Saturday. During Saturday's exam we will be tested on E&M and Thermodynamics/Statistical Mechanics. We get to take 2 books to each exam, so I basically can take 1 Thermo Book with me (I'm also taking Griffiths on Saturday). The exam is supposed to cover material up to "advanced undergraduate," and, for Thermo specifically, to the level of Kittel: "Thermal Physics."

    As an undergrad, we used "Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics" by Ashley Carter. Did anyone else use this book? Does anyone know how Kittel and Carter compare (in terms of the amount of material covered)?

    If there is a great deal more material covered in Kittel, I may try to get it to study and take it on Saturday. Otherwise, I'll just use Carter, especially since that is the one I am used to.

    Thanks for your time, y'all.
    Austin
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 18, 2009 #2

    Landau

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    I don't know the book, but if I were you I would definitely skim through Kittel to make sure you know all the stuff you should. (although it's a bit late to learn new material)

    After reading some reviews, it seems that Carter is less advanced/formal than Kittel, with less emphasis on statistical physics. One reviewer even said
    If that's true, I'm wishing you good luck. I can't imagine that the Phd qualifier does not expect you to know canonical and grand canonical...
     
  4. Aug 18, 2009 #3

    a_h

    User Avatar

    Hi Landau,

    Thanks for replying. Actually, I've already had Statistical Mechanics here (i.e., at the graduate level), so I feel pretty comfortable on that front (as in, canonical and grand canonical roll off my tongue :tongue: ). It's more the classical thermodynamics aspect that I wanted to compare.

    Austin
     
  5. Aug 18, 2009 #4

    Landau

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Ah, that's good! :) Since much of Kittel's book is statistical, you'll probably be fine anyway. I'm afraid I can't help you with the comparison, I only used Kittel in my two Thermal Physic bachelor courses. Good luck!
     
  6. Aug 18, 2009 #5

    a_h

    User Avatar

    Alrighty, that's great to hear. Thanks for your time and wishing me luck!

    Now back to studying...:smile:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook