Computational physics career change

In summary: There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best way to pursue a career in physics will vary depending on your individual skills and background. However, if you are interested in pursuing a career in physics, it is important to remember that a graduate degree in physics is often necessary in order to get a professional job in the field.
  • #1
quantknight
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Hi, I am confused about which to choose between computational physics and data science. Actually I am a computer science undergraduate and I have 4 years of experience in data mining. I discovered my interest in physics, so I planned to do a graduate degree with the focus of physics. But the problem is my ug is 3 years and most of universities don't accept my degree for computational sciences but they are okay to admit me into data science program.
My questions are, so is there any option of studying extra year in university to bridge the knowledge gap for computational physics? or can i choose the option of data science and take physics papers along with it??
If I do a data science program along with physics is it equivalent to computational physics?? would I get physics related jobs?
Is there any other options available to pursue my career in physics?
I am looking for universities in Canada.
 
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  • #2
To do a graduate degree in physics in Canada, you pretty much need an undergraduate degree in physics or it's equivalent (for example, physical chemistry, or engineering physics).

Doing a single "bridge year" will often not be enough, but a lot will depend on what courses you've done up until this point. For example, your course work would need to include advanced (ie. third or fourth year) undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, classical mechanics, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, an advanced laboratory course, as well as the necessary mathematics up to and including a mathematical methods course. These courses have prerequisites, so it's usually not possible to just pick up a couple courses and then apply.

A "data science" program is not going to get you into physics from a professional point of view, unless perhaps you get involved as a supporter or collaborator with a physics project that needs a data scientist. Even then, someone else will be doing the physics. You would be doing the data science. It's also important to remember that most people who graduate with a PhD in physics don't end up with an academic career in physics. These days the PhD is more-or-less necessary, but far from sufficient.
 
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  • #3
thanks choppy, the reason I want to pursue physics career is I developed interest in it. I have been spectator in physics for a particular period of time, but now I want to involve myself in the subject. I feel I discovered my passion towards physics ,I would feel very bad if I don't do anything in it. I cannot afford to start over from the beginning. So I thought by doing a computational physics degree(some programs allow math and computer science graduates) would help me to get a career in physics.

Do I have any other option of doing physics or working in physics field??
 

Related to Computational physics career change

What is computational physics?

Computational physics is a field that uses computer algorithms and mathematical models to study physical phenomena. It combines elements of physics, computer science, and mathematics to develop simulations and analyze data.

What skills are necessary for a career in computational physics?

A strong background in physics, mathematics, and computer science is essential for a career in computational physics. Other important skills include problem-solving, critical thinking, and programming skills in languages such as C++, Python, and MATLAB.

What job opportunities are available in computational physics?

There are various job opportunities in computational physics, including research positions in academia, government labs, and private companies. Some common job titles in this field include computational physicist, research scientist, data scientist, and software engineer.

Do I need a PhD to work in computational physics?

While a PhD is not always required, it is highly recommended for most research positions in computational physics. A PhD not only provides a strong foundation in the subject matter but also demonstrates a high level of expertise and dedication to the field.

What are the benefits of a career in computational physics?

A career in computational physics offers a diverse range of opportunities, from conducting cutting-edge research to developing new technologies and solutions. It also allows for collaboration with experts in different fields and the potential for making significant contributions to the scientific community.

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