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Physics Computer science in Astrophysics?

  1. Jul 8, 2010 #1
    Computer science in Astrophysics??

    I'm thinking of majoring in computer science specializing in software engineering, along with a major in astrophysics. My main focus is something in astrophysics (not sure yet), so I was wondering how important would it be get a Masters or PhD considering I want to work in the industry? Any thoughts, thanks in advance.
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 8, 2010 #2
    Re: Computer science in Astrophysics??

    Great plan. If you do both comp sci and astrophys you'll have LOTS of options after your bachelors. If you want to pursue astrophysics research, yeah you're really going to need the PhD. As for comp sci (especially with physics background), thats really not the case; it would be doable to get into a good job/business/etc without a M.S./PhD (tho it would help).
  4. Jul 8, 2010 #3
    Re: Computer science in Astrophysics??

    If you really enjoy (read: really enjoy) physics, then you should think about a Ph.D. or an M.S. Either way, if you can code, and you have a solid astro background, there are a number of options open to you in academia, and a number of advisors who would be quick to pay you to do just that.

    If you don't REALLY love physics, though, you're probably better off going right into industry. You shouldn't have too much of a problem with a double major in CS and Physics (which sounds like the direction in which you're heading).

    If you REALLY love computer science, then I'm sure an M.S. will help you more than a Ph.D., depending on the type of job you want. I think it is a bad idea to get a Ph.D. in something with the intent to switch fields. If, for example, you want to work in Finance, getting a Ph.D. in physics (or economics, or statistics, or computer science, or finance, or ...) is one way to get there.
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  5. Jul 9, 2010 #4
    Re: Computer science in Astrophysics??

    Wow thanks a lot guys wasn't expecting a reply so soon, but thank you for the advice, helps to clear the confusion.
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