Confusion about the right hand rule (Lorentz Force)

In summary, the conversation discusses a basic experiment to demonstrate the right hand rule and cross magnetic field results in a force perpendicular to the plane of the other two. However, the experimenter consistently gets a force in the same direction as the magnetic field. Suggestions are made to use a more uniform magnetic field, two straight parallel wires, and a stronger current. It is also recommended to do a calculation to check the expected force and to explore using a C-shaped yoke made of steel to create a more uniform field. The conversation also mentions that in past experiments, a horseshoe magnet, wire loop, and battery were used to produce the expected motion.
  • #1
sk8ermeb
3
0
Hello. I am trying to do a basic experiment to demonstrate
I⊗β≈ƒ
or current cross magnetic field results in a force perpendicular to the plane of the other two. But every time I test this out, it appears I get a force in the same direction as the magnetic field. Here is my experiment:
Strong magnets in the "x" direction or horizontal. A wire running through the center carrying 50 mA or so. According to the right hand rule the force on the wire should either be up or down depending on the polarity, but every time I try this, the wire snaps right to one of the magnets? It appears that the wire becomes "magnetic" and will go to either side depending on which is closer. What am I missing, or how could I modify this experiment to demonstrate the right hand rule?

Thank you in advance
 

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  • #2
The magnetic field will be highly non-uniform in that setup. You may need to get a much more uniform field. A better approach may be two straight parallel wires. The field will not be uniform, but it will be more symmetric.
 
  • #3
You may also want to use a much stronger current and constrain the motion of the wire.
Google current balance :

1610379468964.png

And: do the calculation to check what force you expect to measure...
 
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  • #4
The magnets these days are so darned strong. In the past, a horseshoe magnet, a loop of wire and a battery would produce the motion you'd expect.
sk8ermeb said:
the wire snaps right to one of the magnets?
Did you mean "one of the poles"? The field could be really wild between two different magnets.
If you can make up a C shaped yoke out of steel to add to the magnet, you may get a more uniform field between poles consisting of two wide plates. Look at Google images of experiments with magnetism for ideas with your equipment.
 

Related to Confusion about the right hand rule (Lorentz Force)

1. What is the right hand rule and how does it relate to the Lorentz Force?

The right hand rule is a method used to determine the direction of a magnetic field or the force on a charged particle in a magnetic field. It is used in conjunction with the Lorentz Force, which describes the force on a charged particle moving in a magnetic field.

2. How do I use the right hand rule to determine the direction of the magnetic field?

To determine the direction of the magnetic field using the right hand rule, point your thumb in the direction of the current or the motion of the charged particle, and curl your fingers. The direction your fingers point is the direction of the magnetic field.

3. What is the difference between the right hand rule and the left hand rule?

The right hand rule is used to determine the direction of a magnetic field or the force on a charged particle in a magnetic field. The left hand rule is used to determine the direction of the electric field or the force on a charged particle in an electric field.

4. Can the right hand rule be used for both positive and negative charges?

Yes, the right hand rule can be used for both positive and negative charges. The direction of the force will be opposite for negative charges, but the direction of the magnetic field will remain the same.

5. How does the right hand rule apply to real-life situations?

The right hand rule is used in a variety of real-life situations, such as determining the direction of the magnetic field in a wire carrying a current, or understanding the motion of charged particles in a magnetic field, which is important in fields such as particle physics and electrical engineering.

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