Couple questions about speakers and speaker boxes

In summary, some speaker boxes differ in shape, some speakers might be bigger or heavier than others, and they're made of different materials to prevent sound from escaping.
  • #1
blue_print101
8
0
1) Why might speaker boxes differ in shape?

2) Why might some speakers be bigger or heavier than others?

3) Why are speaker surfaces made of materials other than regular paper or styrofoam?
 
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  • #2
Question about shape of speaker boxes

Why might speaker boxes differ in shape?
 
  • #3
Question about size and weight of speakers

Why might some speakers be bigger or heavier than others?
 
  • #4
Question about speaker surfaces materials

Why are speaker surfaces made of materials other than regular paper or styrofoam?
 
  • #5
I think you need to do a little research on your own. The things you need to think about are wavelengths and reflection or attenuation...
 
  • #6


This sounds like homework. What are your thoughts?
 
  • #7
We don't spoonfeed homework here. If that's what you're looking for, you've come to the wrong place.
 
  • #8


... you know what I'm going to say, doncha?
 
  • #9
blue_print101 said:
1) Why might speaker boxes differ in shape?

2) Why might some speakers be bigger or heavier than others?

3) Why are speaker surfaces made of materials other than regular paper or styrofoam?

I merged the 3 threads started by blue_print on this topic.

blue_print -- as you are being told in your thread(s), you must show your work and attempt at answering your questions, before we can be of tutorial assistance. Please show us what you have done, and impress us! :biggrin:
 
  • #10
Here's what I think;

1) Speaker boxes differ in shape because sometimes people may want to have multiple speakers in 1 box, also the power of the speakers might be different.

2) Some speakers might be bigger of heavier than others because they could be made of different materials.

3) They're made of styrofoam and regular paper because they prevent sound from escaping.
 
  • #11
blue_print101 said:
Here's what I think;

1) Speaker boxes differ in shape because sometimes people may want to have multiple speakers in 1 box, also the power of the speakers might be different.

2) Some speakers might be bigger of heavier than others because they could be made of different materials.

3) They're made of styrofoam and regular paper because they prevent sound from escaping.

Partially correct. Check out this intro article at wikipedia.org, and see if it changes any of your answers. BTW, on the last one, I think they are asking about the actual material on the moving cone of the speaker (the part that makes the sound), not the speaker enclosure.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loudspeaker

.
 

Related to Couple questions about speakers and speaker boxes

1. What is the difference between a passive and active speaker?

A passive speaker requires an external amplifier to power it, while an active speaker has a built-in amplifier. This means that an active speaker can be connected directly to a source, while a passive speaker requires an additional amplifier to function.

2. How do I determine the wattage and impedance for my speakers?

The wattage and impedance of your speakers can typically be found in the user manual or on the back of the speaker itself. If not, you can use a multimeter to measure the impedance, and the wattage can be calculated by multiplying the voltage and current ratings of the speaker.

3. What is the purpose of a crossover in a speaker box?

A crossover is used to split the audio signal into different frequency ranges, sending higher frequencies to the tweeter and lower frequencies to the woofer. This helps to improve sound quality and prevent distortion.

4. Can I mix and match speakers of different brands and sizes in a speaker box?

While it is possible to mix and match speakers, it is not recommended. Speakers of different brands and sizes may have different impedance and frequency response, which can affect the overall sound quality and potentially damage the speakers.

5. How do I know if my speaker box is properly sealed?

You can test the seal of your speaker box by placing a light source inside and checking for any leaks. You can also use a rubber sealant or gasket to ensure a tight seal. Additionally, listening to the sound quality of your speakers can also indicate if the box is properly sealed or not.

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