Current standing of qubit research

  • Thread starter Verdict
  • Start date
  • #1
117
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

Good day everyone,
I apologize if this is not the correct forum; in some way it is a homework question but not of the ordinary form. This semester I will be writing a ~3000 word paper on the topic of the current standing in qubit research, where I will be describing and comparing various different approaches/researches to creating qubits to be used in a quantum computer. I am a third year bachelor of physics student, so I do understand 'some' of the technical parts, but overall it will not be that in depth.
Now my question is mostly if you could help me out and point me in the right direction. As this is a topic where you can't (as far as I can tell) find a simple overview of different approaches and go from there, I'm having some issues creating a comprehensive list of techniques that I will focus on. One idea that I had was looking at some of the recent conferences on the topic, as that will surely list several different approaches, but I haven't been able to find a suitable one. This might just be me though, I've never actually browsed through conferences before and I don't know what the actual terms would be that they would use to describe this kind of research.

One of the things that I will look into is he usage of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, as I found it rather intriguing and (as far as I can tell) it has quite some potential. Another thing that comes to mind is the majorana fermion, and maybe quantum dots. But apart from that I am a bit lost. I would be very grateful if you could help me out and suggest some other interesting approaches, and again I apologize if this is not the correct place to talk about this. I suppose it could lead to a rather interesting discussion as well, so please do post your own opinions on the subject!

Kind regards
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
f95toli
Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,952
448
You need to have a look at superconducting qubits as well since this is one if the leading candidates and is a scalable technique.
There was a fairly recent review in Nature (or perhaps it was Science) which should explain the basics and the state-of-the art (although this is a rapidly developing field)
 
  • #3
117
0
Last edited by a moderator:

Related Threads on Current standing of qubit research

  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
838
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
577
Replies
7
Views
986
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
689
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
739
  • Last Post
Replies
17
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
921
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
596
Top