Difference between real and virtual objects? (optics)

In summary, a real object has light coming from it and a real image has light actually passing through it.
  • #1
Ravik Rocha
2
1
I do know the difference between real and virtual images. I would like to know the difference between real and virtual objects. I need some examples.
See this picture
 
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  • #2
Hi and welcome to PF.
From the picture it seems that their definition involves whether or not real rays of light actually pass through the object or image. A virtual object or image is just a way of describing what's happening to the light because neither can have any effect in itself. A real object actually has light coming from it and a real image actually has light actually passing through it. This is why people say that you can't project a virtual image.
A word of caution about this common worry about naming things. The terms real and virtual in this respect are only crude classifications, beloved of old fashioned ,rote teaching and don't have a lot to do with understanding how to predict how an actual optical system will perform. I can't imagine any worth while test or exam would demand that you use the 'correct' term. More important would be to predict where the image is formed.
A 'virtual Object' will have been formed by another optical element further up the chain which will have formed a virtual Image (the same virtual thing with two different names)
 
  • #3
If you put an optical instrument on the road of the light rays to create a real image, the real image that will become virtual objects. You know how to a real object create a real image?
upload_2018-7-14_20-21-54.png
 

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  • #4
Ravik Rocha said:
I would like to know the difference between real and virtual objects. I need some examples.

Consider, for example, the Galilean telescope which contains two lenses. Its objective lens has a real object. Its eyepiece, which is a concave lens, has a virtual object.
 
  • #5
A real object is one which is practically present in front of an Optical Instrument.

A virtual object is an an image produced by an optical instrument which is made incident on any other optical instrument.

Suppose you have two mirrors. You place an object in front of one mirror. The mirror will produce an image and this image can be made incident on the other mirror. For the other mirror, thus image is virtual object.

you may visit cbse class10 video for more understanding on https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPiuJvuyMVFSwcIdBCTpTyQ
 
  • #6
Jyoti said:
Suppose you have two mirrors. You place an object in front of one mirror. The mirror will produce an image and this image can be made incident on the other mirror. For the other mirror, thus image is virtual object.

Are you sure about that? A real object also means the incident light is a divergent beam, and a virtual object means the incident light is a convergent beam. The first mirror does not transform a divergent beam into a convergent one.
 

What is the difference between real and virtual objects in optics?

In optics, real objects are physical objects that exist in the real world and can be seen with the naked eye. They emit or reflect light, which is then detected by our eyes. Virtual objects, on the other hand, are created through the manipulation of light by lenses or mirrors. They are not physically present and cannot be seen without the aid of optical devices.

How are real objects and virtual objects different in terms of image formation?

Real objects produce real images, meaning that the light rays coming from the object actually meet and form an image on a surface. Virtual objects, on the other hand, produce virtual images. This means that the light rays only appear to come from a specific point and do not actually meet at that point.

Can we interact with virtual objects in the same way as real objects?

No, because virtual objects are not physically present, we cannot interact with them in the same way as real objects. For example, we cannot touch or manipulate a virtual object with our hands.

How do we perceive the difference between real and virtual objects?

Our eyes and brain work together to perceive the difference between real and virtual objects. When we look at a real object, the light rays coming from the object enter our eyes and are focused on the retina, producing a clear and sharp image. However, when we look at a virtual object, the light rays are manipulated by lenses or mirrors and do not enter our eyes in the same way, resulting in a blurred or distorted image.

What are some real-life applications of virtual objects in optics?

Virtual objects have many practical applications, such as in virtual reality (VR) technology, where they are used to create immersive and interactive environments. They are also commonly used in video games, simulators, and medical imaging devices, allowing us to see and interact with objects that are not physically present.

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