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Difficulty With Integration by Parts

  • Thread starter Shoney45
  • Start date
  • #1
68
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Homework Statement


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Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

What I am unsure of is how to find the derivative of u. Since the original integral is integrating with respect to y, should I be finding the derivative of u with respect to y, and treat the x's as contants?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
201
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I think it's possible to solve it in terms of x

let u=x and dv=e^(-x(1+y))

then,
du=1
and v= [e^(-x(1+y))]/(-(1+y))

I think it should work

if you want let
u=e^(-x(1+y))

du= -(1+y)*e^(-x(1+y))

you treat y as a constant and x as a variable
(I am assuming you want to integrate in terms of x)
 
  • #3
68
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Alrighty then - I'll get to work. Thanks for the direction.
 
  • #4
jav
35
0
I think it's possible to solve it in terms of x

let u=x and dv=e^(-x(1+y))

then,
du=1
and v= [e^(-x(1+y))]/(-(1+y))
Actually du = dx, also dv=e^(-x(1+y))dx

You can simplify this problem, by performing a w substitution at the beginning ie. consider w = -x*(1+y). It will make the integration by parts less of a headache.
 

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