1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Dipole in a nonuniform electric field problem

  1. Feb 28, 2017 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A point charge Q is held at a distance r from the center of a dipole that consists of two charges ±q separated by a distance s. The dipole is initially oriented so that Q is in the plane bisecting the dipole. Assume that r≫s.

    A) Immediately after the dipole is released, what is the magnitude of the force on the dipole?

    B) Immediately after the dipole is released, what is the magnitude of the torque on the dipole?

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    [PLAIN]https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/krQ_JEzmRURs4ZqAkRwrapePDCVyz9DBcELyMJ8-tY1g2JYfSLGdkD4lv4_F_2FaaeXrNoN-ZofGqnvD3VNp8AgsogPnk_kYrS2RL9SY5A6K-q9RTfBwq5_Nv_exlvGk5w_Ui0p2kXAdQa1Jw005jR1eRS9G-0lFjnzhD7CfsHB8-pmm0Kxj-BRM_MQbHapBvyIVizorUYPVqCZNcPo1I8I0u83mzPTSJJdylwMoiC2qDsochCphoyNwRT62P_0p_VF0SKk2qpIhhLIdGO9EUow30nxJjp4EvvSKOMZGSaHl-aXsbewtiwn9ky2DmswaV_GOlaW2UFAhDKbytrYhK9GJ-kyP_PLobfQ_jyhIkKldBX29OF8DUKXyodk6Q4n3N5aW1X10msWQ_tzuchKdsmubrePdPNWxTWIHfLr4z9PL4NeXi5BaCm7QSaWWAyAWmRTkJwUx7AE9zwLyqdBmrwSxZIgZlK2z5_LM8rlKqCK3XdixKgaDBS9tOzi4wLe9Gp96Jn7gJpG_m5EwwgaA3LVHTWIWAWFvqzb_FXTW86j-81g_mAdb2Xltz2xyBYoA_Ozaai1Q46fI5-cPOp7f_rezMCPQ5gmLG-jD6g6m-KSyFMMzCkuT=w497-h662-no[/B] [Broken]

    I treated the two charges on the dipole as point charges and then found the force vectors acting on them. Then I broke down the forces into their components and added them. The x components canceled and I was left with just a y component. For some reason this is wrong, though.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 28, 2017 #2

    kuruman

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    It is not easy to read what the y-component is. Can you use LaTeX to write it down? I agree that the x-component is zero.
     
  4. Feb 28, 2017 #3
    Here is the net y-component of the force.

    [tex] \frac{Qqs}{4\pi\epsilon_{0}(r^2+\frac{s^2}{4})^{3/2}} [/tex]
     
  5. Feb 28, 2017 #4

    gneill

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I suspect that they want you to incorporate their specified assumption: Assume that r≫s
     
  6. Feb 28, 2017 #5

    kuruman

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Exactly what I was about to type in. Before you do that, factor out of the radical r in the denominator.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Dipole in a nonuniform electric field problem
Loading...