Does a solenoid get warm with inductance?

In summary, the conversation discussed the factors that contribute to the heating of a solenoid, including copper resistance and inductance. It was also mentioned that in the software Femm, the voltage drop parameter does not need to be specified as it is present in the entire circuit. The conversation also touched on the topic of losses in a magnetic core and the importance of choosing appropriate wire insulation for the expected voltage.
  • #1
BenTHS
Hi,

I'm wondering if a solenoid is only hot by copper resistance or in addition with the inductance produced into the coil too ?

Another small question : in the sofware Femm there is a computing result parameter called "voltage drop"; does it means you need ( at least ) x volt to get the magnetic field or is it necessary to use much higher voltage ?
In Femm you indicate the diameter and kind of wire, the intensity or the number of turn but not the voltage of the power supply; I'm surprised ?Thanks by advance
 
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  • #2
Only resistance heats up with ##I^2R## losses. Pure L and puree C don't. But in real life and nothing is pure.
 
  • #3
If the coil core is not of a ferromagnetic material-and no ferromagnetic material is in vicinity then no losses are expected. Since we are speaking about L and reactive power it is about a.c. current. In a.c. a magnetic core presents eddy-current and hysteresis losses. These losses could heat the core and from here the copper could be heated also. See-for instance:
Modeling Magnetic Core Loss for Sinusoidal Waveforms
http://www.dtic.mil/get-tr-doc/pdf?AD=ADA488218
I agree with you, in order to calculate the Fem one needs only L and I [Fem=LdI/dt].The voltage is present in the entire supplied circuit. However, the wire insulation has to be chosen according the presumable voltage.
 

Related to Does a solenoid get warm with inductance?

1. How does a solenoid produce heat with inductance?

When a current flows through a solenoid, it creates a magnetic field. As the magnetic field changes, it induces a voltage in the solenoid, which creates a back current. This back current then causes resistance in the solenoid, resulting in heat being produced.

2. What factors affect the amount of heat produced by a solenoid with inductance?

The amount of heat produced by a solenoid with inductance depends on the current flowing through the solenoid, the number of turns in the coil, the material of the solenoid, and the frequency of the current.

3. Is it normal for a solenoid to get warm when in use?

Yes, it is normal for a solenoid to get warm when in use. The heat produced is a byproduct of the inductance process and is typically not harmful unless the solenoid is being overloaded.

4. Can a solenoid overheat due to inductance?

Yes, a solenoid can overheat if the current flow is too high or the frequency is too high, causing excessive heat to be produced. It is important to properly size and design the solenoid to prevent overheating.

5. How can I prevent a solenoid from getting too warm with inductance?

To prevent a solenoid from getting too warm with inductance, ensure that the solenoid is properly sized for the intended current and frequency. Additionally, using materials with lower resistance and proper ventilation can help dissipate heat and prevent overheating.

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