Does air resistance have a max value?

In summary, friction on a surface has a maximum value that is dependent on the normal force. When an object is pushed with a force greater than the maximum friction value, it will move. However, when a free-falling object falls from a height, air resistance also has a maximum value which is equal to the weight of the object. This is due to the drag limit being equal to the weight force and the drag coefficient being dependent on the shape and orientation of the object.
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I know that friction on a surface has a maximum value. When an object is pushed with a force greater than the maximum friction value, the object will move.
But when a free-falling object falls from a height, does air resistance have a maximum value as well?
 
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r4g3r4hk said:
I know that friction on a surface has a maximum value. When an object is pushed with a force greater than the maximum friction value, the object will move.
That's an odd way to view it. Static friction is a function of the normal force. There is no theoretical limit, only practical/materials limits.
But when a free-falling object falls from a height, does air resistance have a maximum value as well?
By constraining the scenario to [atmospheric, I assume] free fall, you are defining the drag limit to be equal to the weight of the object.
 
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Thanks for the replies! I believe I understand now.
 
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