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Does it make sense scientifically and linguistically?

  1. Aug 29, 2015 #1

    Grz

    User Avatar

    Hello everyone,

    I have an unusual request. Since I am not a native speaker of English, would you be willing to check if I didn't write something infinitely stupid? Do you notice anything that sounds strange/out-of-place/not English at all? Any missed articles? I would be really grateful for every comment.


    HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR

    The tent underwent high voltage tests with discharges produced by an impulse voltage generator. An electrode imitating a tourist's head had been placed in the tent. The estimated voltage depended on the distance between the tent and the end of the electrode and varied between 400 kv and 1MV.

    CURRENT GENERATOR TEST

    High current generator was used to check the tent's durability. A series of electrical discharges with different peak current values were directed at the top of the frame of poles.

    TESTS RESULTS

    Where the pole segments connected to each other scorches could be noticed, which means that those points experienced very high temperatures. That is explained by their relativly high resistance. The stakes, which laid freely on the laboratory floor furing the tests, melted to some extend. Again, it suggests high temperatures generated at those points during discharges. A dramatic temperature increase in the short period of time resulted in sparks, i.e. particles of hot aluminum. The generated peak current was comparable to that occurring in a lightning – statistically, it varies between 30 and 40 kA, though higher values (more than 200 kA ) have been also reported.

     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 29, 2015 #2
    Should be "A high current generator..."
     
  4. Aug 29, 2015 #3

    anorlunda

    Staff: Mentor

    I think you did it very well. Scorches is OK, but "some scorching" is the more common way to say it.
     
  5. Aug 30, 2015 #4

    meBigGuy

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Minor corrections in bold, none technical. It was very well expressed.

    HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR

    The tent underwent high voltage tests with discharges produced by an impulse voltage generator. An electrode imitating a tourist's head was placed in the tent. The estimated voltage depended on the distance between the tent and the end of the electrode and was varied between 400 kv and 1MV.

    CURRENT GENERATOR TEST

    A High current generator was used to check the tent's durability. A series of electrical discharges with different peak current values were directed at the top of the tent poles.

    TESTS RESULTS

    Where the pole segments connected to each other scorches could be noticed, which means that those points experienced very high temperatures. That is explained by their relatively high resistance. The tent stakes, which laid freely on the laboratory floor during the tests, melted to some extent. Again, it suggests high temperatures generated at those points during the discharges. A dramatic temperature increase in the short period of time resulted in sparks, i.e. particles of hot aluminum. The generated peak current was comparable to that occurring in a lightning strike. Statistically, lightning strikes vary between 30 and 40 kA, though higher values (more than 200 kA ) have been also reported.
     
  6. Aug 30, 2015 #5

    Grz

    User Avatar

    Thank you, Dr. Courtney and anorlunda. And special thanks to you, meBigGuy. The fact that complete strangers are eager to help complete strangers never ceases to amaze me.
     
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