Does music effect your mood?

  • Thread starter Mr. dude
  • Start date
Music will heal your soul and your broken heart, i regret to say that though.
anyway, wish you best luck and healthy.
Again, I am truely sorry.

Come on, just smile like this :smile: :smile:,

Spendin sometimes watching movies, chilling out with friends might be of great help for you....
 
honestrosewater
Gold Member
2,071
5
zoobyshoe said:
Jelfish? Did you mean to write Jellyfish?
And do you happen to rove at night? :uhh:
 
138
4
zoobyshoe said:
But, both bodily responses are the same thing: emotions. I think you are operating under an erroneous dichotomy between the emotions evoked in everyday life and those evoked by music. The ones evoked by music are every bit as first hand shall we say, as the ones that come from all non-musical situations. The particular flavor of emotion you get from a piece of music is created then and there for the first time in direct response to the sound progressions, and don't have to be referenced to any previous experience.
Not two different types of emotions, just two different paths to evoking emotions.

Personal Experience -> Emotion <-> Physiological Response
Music -> Physiological Response <-> Emotion [-> Personal Experience]

The thing is - I don't think the emotions evoked by music are really first hand. I think they conjure up a physiological response when interpretted that reminds the person of an emotion. Of course, if a certain piece of music is directly associated in your mind with a specific emotion-filled event, then the memory of the event fits into the puzzle as well. I was refering to general pieces of music where only its form and structure (not recognizability or resemblance to known works) are in question.

The music is usually doing all the emotional heavy lifting. If you subtract the scary shrieking sort of sounds from the psycho shower scene it is easily only 1/4 as disturbing. If you subtract John Williams from Star Wars you've cut the whole experience by at least half. Music is as important to film as glaze is to pottery. It can vastly change the whole emotional content. It is really much less a matter of matching the emotion in the scene as it is isolating and greatly heightening an aspect of the scene the composer and director want the audience to be steered to focus on. It's like Homer Simpson said while watching TV: "I know he's evil! Can't you hear the music?"
I can easily agree with that. Think about the very first time you heard the Star Wars theme while watching the movie. If you say that the music is more than half the experience, then it must have evoked emotions far past what the movie scene could have implied. However, when you were listening to the music, did you have in your mind a specific situation to which you could relate this music to and thus the correct emotion? Did perhaps the scene imply the type of emotion whereas the music multiplied its power? Or maybe hearing the music evoked a physiological response that you associated with excitement. This is the link that I'm talking about.

Jelfish? Did you mean to write Jellyfish?
Nope :biggrin: (Yes, I know - marvel at my forum-name-creating abilities). I personally like octopuses more though, now that I think of it. They're much more intellegent. I also don't care much for seafood. I'm probably crazy.
 
fuzzyfelt
Gold Member
749
4
I didn't go into the theory behind it, but there is talk that listening to classical music as a baby helps with maths later in life. I did just play Mozart to my little ones while giving them a massage and sending them off to sleep. Now, a few years on, they just go into a zone whenever they hear Mozart. Beautiful!
 
138
4
I always found that Mozart for babie making them 'smart' a little far fetched and overhyped. However, Mozart's music, especially his earlier work (his first composition was written when he was 3, I believe) is very structured. It's probably most obvious in his keyboard work. It's sort of hard to explain without having an example, but there's an overall pattern that is very distinguishable in his music. An analogy can perhaps be made to a standard grammar-school 3 paragraph essay. Anyway, I suppose having babies listen to such music can give them a method of learning and understanding the concept of chronological and procedural structure without having the need to first learn to understand a spoken language. I suppose this can have ramifications in understanding mathematical concepts.
 
fuzzyfelt
Gold Member
749
4
That makes good sense to me, thanks
 
6,171
1,275
Jelfish said:
Not two different types of emotions, just two different paths to evoking emotions.

Personal Experience -> Emotion <-> Physiological Response
Music -> Physiological Response <-> Emotion [-> Personal Experience]
I don't get the separate mentions of emotion and physiological response. You seem to be saying there is such a thing as emotion without a feeling in your body. If I don't feel something in my body, I'm not having an emotion.
The thing is - I don't think the emotions evoked by music are really first hand. I think they conjure up a physiological response when interpretted that reminds the person of an emotion.
This is completely outside my experience, and I don't know what to make of it. The physiological responses I have to music are indistinguishable by me from the physiological responses I have to anything: a persons face, a great painting, a dead dog in the road, a cool tree, the sight of the ocean, a bad news letter, a good news letter. The emotions I experience from these things are all of the same cloth as the emotions evoked by music. I have never had the impression I am being reminded of emotions by music, but that it is eliciting emotions.
However, when you were listening to the music, did you have in your mind a specific situation to which you could relate this music to and thus the correct emotion?
No. I just felt what I felt. There was no reference to anything other than the movie in front of me.
Did perhaps the scene imply the type of emotion whereas the music multiplied its power?
IIRC the opening scene is the "A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away..." bit. And I think the music is the grand, main theme which is mostly brass and strings. In this case the music was just about entirely responsible for the emotional ambiance. You are completely steered by the music, and not much at all by the visual. Any one watching that opening for the first time with no music at all could easily not have an inkling of music like the William's score. It could suggest entirely different music to each and every composer who watched a silent version with no knowledge of the version we know.
Or maybe hearing the music evoked a physiological response that you associated with excitement.
I would not put it this way at all. It was directly exiting in it's own right, in is own way, not associated with exitement.
Nope :biggrin: (Yes, I know - marvel at my forum-name-creating abilities).
How many others do you have and what are they? I came up with zoobyshoe and stopped there. I can't top genius.
I personally like octopuses more though, now that I think of it. They're much more intellegent. I also don't care much for seafood. I'm probably crazy.
Nocturnally roving herds of weird, purple jellyfish are not intelligent, nor are they edible, but they did form the inspiration for Alfred Einstein's astonishing theory: Jellitivity (both special and general).

Some of us are pretty sure you are the first actual weird, purple jellyfish to accomplish the task of signing on to PF, but that you probably couldn't yet get your tentacles to type jellyfish properly when you joined. We're keeping our eye on you.
 
fuzzyfelt
Gold Member
749
4
BTW, the collective noun for jellyfish is 'smack'.
 
6,171
1,275
fi said:
BTW, the collective noun for jellyfish is 'smack'.
Not in Alfred Einstein's native language of Cherman. The original Cherman title of his groundbreaking work was:
Alfred E. said:
On Ze Elektrodynamiks Off Nokternnally Rofink Herdz Off Veerd, Poorpul Chellyfisch
 
honestrosewater
Gold Member
2,071
5
zoobyshoe said:
We're keeping our eye on you.
:rofl:
Yes, our eye is enormous and sees all. But if you keep it on him, how will we use it? :rolleyes:
 
6,171
1,275
honestrosewater said:
:rofl:
Yes, our eye is enormous and sees all. But if you keep it on him, how will we use it? :rolleyes:
I don't know. I think you'd better start a thread in the Philosophy forum and let them work it out phenomenologically.
 
honestrosewater
Gold Member
2,071
5
zoobyshoe said:
I don't know. I think you'd better start a thread in the Philosophy forum and let them work it out phenomenologically.
No, I try not to start phenomenological threads intentionally. :biggrin:

(Eh, there's a joke in there somewhere, honest.)
 
Last edited:
551
1
Listening to music doesn't affect my mood, I don't think.
 
cronxeh
Gold Member
949
10
fourier jr said:
one for the joke thread
Q: what did the raver say when the drugs wore off?
A: dayum, this music sucks!!
:rofl: :rofl:


i for one listen to metal (dimmu borgir, cradle of filth, deicide, cannibal corpse, anaal nathrakh, etc) & industrial stuff (nine inch nails, ministry, etc) when working out. why metal, probably because of the screeching vocals (black metal anyway) & fast drums. the rest of the time (reading, studying, etc) it's mostly old-school baroque stuff.
Worst. Music. Ever
 
honestrosewater said:
:rofl: Now that I think of it, my mom did exactly the same thing with us (4-6 kids).
"4-6 kids"?!? You don't know how many siblings you have?

Jelfish said:
I always found that Mozart for babie making them 'smart' a little far fetched and overhyped..
I don't know. Music can be intellectually stimulating too. Compared to, say, Mozart's Requiem, most pop for instance is incredibly dumb. I'd buy the notion that listening to music that is intellectually as well as emotionally stimulating as a child would brain em up, if for no other reason than being raised and so being predisposed to like that kind of music and so having more stimulating music in your life from a very early age.

I listen to music less for its direct effect on my mood nowadays than to appreciate its art, be it punk, folk, rock, dance, classical, hip hop, country, whatever, which in turn creates an emotional response. I can see how.. I dunno... Blink 182 can cheer you up, Keane can chill you out, NIN can fire you up, but it's such artless rubbish it has no real effect on me. As a consequence, I cannot listen to the radio at all.
 
honestrosewater
Gold Member
2,071
5
El Hombre Invisible said:
"4-6 kids"?!? You don't know how many siblings you have?
What, isn't that normal? :tongue2:
4 stuck-with-them-forever kids, 2 stepkids for a short time.
 
138
4
This is completely outside my experience, and I don't know what to make of it. The physiological responses I have to music are indistinguishable by me from the physiological responses I have to anything: a persons face, a great painting, a dead dog in the road, a cool tree, the sight of the ocean, a bad news letter, a good news letter. The emotions I experience from these things are all of the same cloth as the emotions evoked by music. I have never had the impression I am being reminded of emotions by music, but that it is eliciting emotions.
But then the question becomes - why does a certain type of music elicit a certain type of emotion? Perhaps you're right about emotion and phisiological response being one thing, but I seperated them because phisiological response implies that the physical feeling came first where as emotion implies that the concious realization of the emotion came first. The sole reason why I split them up is that it doesn't make sense to me that a certain type of music can elicit a specific type of emotion without ever having had a direct link to that emotion. Unless perhaps, I'm over analysing and all emotional response from music is due to some sort of past association or resemblance, in which case my argument is moot.

How many others do you have and what are they? I came up with zoobyshoe and stopped there. I can't top genius.
The great thing about Jelfish is that people might think it comes from Jellyfish or Jellofish. The missing syllable adds to my obviously cool and mysterious demeanor :cool: . This is my only PF username.

Nocturnally roving herds of weird, purple jellyfish are not intelligent, nor are they edible, but they did form the inspiration for Alfred Einstein's astonishing theory: Jellitivity (both special and general).

Some of us are pretty sure you are the first actual weird, purple jellyfish to accomplish the task of signing on to PF, but that you probably couldn't yet get your tentacles to type jellyfish properly when you joined. We're keeping our eye on you.
I'll have to look into Jellitivity and incorperate it into my original intention for Jelfish. A search led me to the Ask a Stupid Question thread, but I haven't had time to go through the 150+ pages.

And not to speak for weird, purple jellyfish, but the notion for them to actually using the username - jellyfish - strikes me as odd, especially with the current identity crisis they face in society. Ask average people and they'll probably describe them as weird, purple, and unintelligent. It's quite disfranchising, really.
 
6,171
1,275
Jelfish said:
But then the question becomes - why does a certain type of music elicit a certain type of emotion?
I can't say in great detail. I haven't thought much about it, or tried to find any research that must have been done on this (everything's been researched), but the fact we do have emotional responses to this type of organized sound is undeniable and proven by the long history of human efforts to compose more and more music.
Perhaps you're right about emotion and phisiological response being one thing, but I seperated them because phisiological response implies that the physical feeling came first where as emotion implies that the concious realization of the emotion came first.
The actual train of events is so rapid it isn't possible to watch yourself experiencing first one thing then the other.
The sole reason why I split them up is that it doesn't make sense to me that a certain type of music can elicit a specific type of emotion without ever having had a direct link to that emotion.
Emotions aren't pre-existing things to be linked to. They are generated on the spot, brand new, in response to stimuli.

You may say, I was happy then, and I'm happy now, but the two separate happinesses aren't the same experience, with the second being a "repeat" of the first. The second may strongly resemble the first in quality, but it was created anew on the spot: you never experienced that happiness before.

Each piece of music represents a specific emotional recipe, unlike any other, and elicits a first time train of emotions, spiced in a particular, specific way, which you have actually never tasted before.

If you are reminded of previous experiences that sparked similar emotions, and concentrate only on those, you may get the impression there are "pre-existing" emotions to which one can link. In fact, though, emotions don't exist untill you have them. What we think of as experiencing of the "same" emotion is actually the result of the linguistic need to name things in order to communicate with others. We name a certain range of emotions "happiness" by convention, in order to verbally communicate our emotional states. There is actually no state of "happiness" kept in storage to which we link in response to stimuli. It is generated fresh on the spot each time.
--------------

The great thing about Jelfish is that people might think it comes from Jellyfish or Jellofish. The missing syllable adds to my obviously cool and mysterious demeanor :cool: . This is my only PF username.
You say "cool and mysterious". We say "sneaky and gelatinous".
I'll have to look into Jellitivity and incorperate it into my original intention for Jelfish. A search led me to the Ask a Stupid Question thread, but I haven't had time to go through the 150+ pages.
Ask a Stupid Quetion Get a Stupid Answer - Physics Help and Math Help - Physics Forums
Address:https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=68&page=50&pp=20
And not to speak for weird, purple jellyfish, but the notion for them to actually using the username - jellyfish - strikes me as odd, especially with the current identity crisis they face in society. Ask average people and they'll probably describe them as weird, purple, and unintelligent. It's quite disfranchising, really.
Nocturnally roving herds of weird, purple jellyfish are not the benign, maligned critters you imply. They have an agenda. Although they really aren't very bright, it's true. It would be perfectly consistant with both their agenda, and intelligence, to try to infiltrate PF, but to misunderstand the concept of a "cover", and to throw a typo into the bargain.
 
138
4
It may be true that you never get the same emotion twice exactly, and it may also be true that the classification of emotions leads to perhaps, an overgeneralization of a specific emotion, but there's a reason emotions that are generally called "happiness" are classified clearly and seperately from those called "sadness." When you listen to a piece of music and an emotion is elicited, how do you then clasify that emotion? I think a lot of people can say a certain musical piece is "joyous" or "angry," but what leads to that conclusion? And does this conclusion necessarily require a past association with that sort of music? If not, how does one then classify based on just the music? I guess that's what I'm ultimately trying to explain.

zoobyshoe said:
Nocturnally roving herds of weird, purple jellyfish are not the benign, maligned critters you imply. They have an agenda. Although they really aren't very bright, it's true. It would be perfectly consistant with both their agenda, and intelligence, to try to infiltrate PF, but to misunderstand the concept of a "cover", and to throw a typo into the bargain.
Wht do you mean by "cover"?
 
6,171
1,275
Jelfish said:
When you listen to a piece of music and an emotion is elicited, how do you then clasify that emotion?
During the course of any piece of music a whole train of emotions is elicited. This goes back to what you were saying about tension an resolution. It is a flow or stream of emotion that depends on the creation and resolution of overall tension as well as the ebb and flow of inner sub-tensions. I've never actually heard a piece that sustained one emotion throughout. Alot of music has an overall mood or ambiance that can be verbally symbolized by words like "joyous" or "angry" but nothing so brief can really do a piece of music justice.
And does this conclusion necessarily require a past association with that sort of music?
No. Your experience of a piece of music doesn't require anything with which to associate it.
If not, how does one then classify based on just the music?
Your success in saying anything about the emotional experience you have in response to music is completely dependent on how articulate you are in describing your emotional responses in general.

Your mention of envisioning a certain scene in response to music points to what may be throwing you off. In my experience the evocation of scenes like that are secondary to the primary emotion generated by the music. The music gives you an emotion first, then the scene comes instantly to mind with that music as the "score". You are kind of playing music video editor in your mind, enhancing the whole experience by trying out visuals to go along with the music. I don't believe those scenes somehow represent a core experience of the emotion the music is evoking that you have to reference in order to have an emotional reaction to the music. People who are blind from birth love music intensely, and all they have are body feelings to go by.




Wht do you mean by "cover"?
Aha!!!!
 
EMO Babygirl
honestly...metal don't make you angry and anyone who thinks that has serious problems. Metal just gives you the chance to head bang away all your problems. If a music makes you mad, it is probably my music. EMO/Punk Rock is awesome...but anyway....

Yeah...I'm pretty sure music effects your mood in some ways...like if you are depressed then you listen to depressing piano/violin music and so forth. But whatever...music is a part of everyday life. And i am just a teen blabbering on and on and now I'm gonna go. PEACE!!!!
 
DaveC426913
Gold Member
18,329
1,940
Yeah...I'm pretty sure music effects your mood in some ways...like if you are depressed then you listen to depressing piano/violin music and so forth.
Or slows you down so that you wait 2 years to respond to a thread...
 
397
0
I usually listen to metal when I got to bed, early in the morning on my way to school, and even in the afternoon. I also enjoy bands like Blink 182 and Story of the Year and alternative rock and such. However I do not get mad or angry listening to either. I listen to music because its kind of a relaxing thing to do no matter what it is. Unless its country that is...
 
EMO Babygirl
Or slows you down so that you wait 2 years to respond to a thread...
Or someone is doing a project and happens to come across this thread
Duh!
 

Related Threads for: Does music effect your mood?

  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • Poll
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Poll
  • Last Post
2
Replies
35
Views
10K
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Last Post
5
Replies
111
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
24
Views
3K
Top