Does the charge have a relativistic origin?

In summary: Thread closed.In summary, the angular frequency of the electron in hydrogen is related to the charge-to-mass ratio by the mean of the special relativity.
  • #1
hcl
18
0
Hello,
Is there any evidence that shows a relationship between the angular frequency of the electron in hydrogen, and the charge-to-mass ratio, by the mean of the special relativity ?

Looking to reading you
 
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  • #2
hcl said:
Is there any evidence that shows a relationship between the angular frequency of the electron in hydrogen, and the charge-to-mass ratio

Do you think there should be such a relationship? Why or why not? Please give references.
 
  • #3
PeterDonis said:
Do you think there should be such a relationship? Why or why not? Please give references.

Yes, this relationship is very simple :
fH = 4pi (c^2/v^2) e/m
where fH is the angular frequency of the electron in the hydrogen atom, c is the speed of light, v is the rotation speed of the electron in the hydrogen atom (multiplied by 2).

Reading you
Herve
 
  • #4
hcl said:
fH is the angular frequency of the electron in the hydrogen atom

What do you mean by "angular frequency"? What measurement does this correspond to?

hcl said:
v is the rotation speed of the electron in the hydrogen atom

What do you mean by "rotation speed"? You do understand that the electron is not a little billiard ball orbiting the nucleus, right?
 
  • #5
PeterDonis said:
What do you mean by "angular frequency"? What measurement does this correspond to?
What do you mean by "rotation speed"? You do understand that the electron is not a little billiard ball orbiting the nucleus, right?
I mean the one forcasted by Bohr in the Bohr's model (multiplied by 2) . I mean the ionizing frequency of hydrogen (3.288 1015Hz) multiplied by 2 pi (multiplied by 2).
Don't you have a scientific calculator to vevrify the above relation ?
 
  • #6
hcl said:
the one forcasted by Bohr in the Bohr's model

Which has been known since the early 1920s to be an inaccurate model. So you should not expect it to correctly predict all experimental results. It happened to predict the energy levels of hydrogen to a reasonable approximation based on the data available when it was first proposed, but even by the early 1920s it was known that the hydrogen energy levels had structure that was not predicted by the Bohr model.

hcl said:
the ionizing frequency of hydrogen

That is the frequency of a photon that would be required to take the electron in hydrogen from its ground state to an unbound free state. It has nothing whatever to do with any "angular frequency" of the electron's orbit (which isn't really a meaningful concept anyway).

hcl said:
Don't you have a scientific calculator to vevrify the above relation ?

A scientific calculator is no help in telling you whether the number you are calculating makes sense. Yours doesn't.
 
  • #8
hcl said:
I mean the one forcasted by Bohr in the Bohr's model (multiplied by 2) . I mean the ionizing frequency of hydrogen (3.288 1015Hz) multiplied by 2 pi (multiplied by 2).
Don't you have a scientific calculator to vevrify the above relation ?
Of course we have access to calculators to check that calculation. We also have access to a century of theoretical developments and experimental results since Bohr proposed his model, so we know that Bohr's model is not accurate and that any discussion involving "rotational velocity" is based on a near-total misunderstanding of the physics involved.
 
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Related to Does the charge have a relativistic origin?

1. What is the definition of relativistic charge?

Relativistic charge is a concept in physics that describes how the properties of electric charge change when an object is moving at high speeds, close to the speed of light. It takes into account the effects of relativity, including time dilation and length contraction, on the behavior of charged particles.

2. How does the concept of relativistic charge differ from classical charge?

In classical physics, charge is a fundamental property of matter that does not change with motion. However, in relativistic physics, charge is affected by the velocity and acceleration of the charged object, leading to changes in its properties such as mass and electric field.

3. What is the relationship between relativistic charge and special relativity?

Relativistic charge is closely related to the principles of special relativity, which describe the behavior of objects in motion at high speeds. The concept of relativistic charge arises from the need to incorporate the effects of special relativity into the classical understanding of charge.

4. How is the relativistic origin of charge related to the electromagnetic field?

The electromagnetic field is responsible for the behavior of electrically charged particles. In relativistic physics, the properties of this field are affected by the motion of charged objects, leading to changes in the behavior of the particles and their interactions with each other.

5. Can relativistic charge be observed in everyday life?

Yes, the effects of relativistic charge can be observed in everyday life, especially in high energy or high-speed situations. For example, in particle accelerators, the behavior of charged particles is influenced by their relativistic charge, leading to the production of high-energy collisions. However, these effects are not noticeable in everyday situations where objects are moving at much lower speeds.

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