DsRNA inhibition

Monique

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An interesting concept worth sharing: knocking a gene out in an organism.. how to do that.. now, dsRNA is used in the process. Eukaryotic organisms don’t have dsRNA (double stranded) only ssRNA. Some virusses though, DO have dsRNA. A eucaryotic organisms reacts to dsRNA by inhibiting the transcription of that particular RNA. But it turns out that ssRNA transcription of the particular kind is also inhibited! So if you’d like to knock out a gene in a model organism, inject it with dsRNA that codes for the gene. Every cell of the organism will react and knockout the fragment.

There must be some catches to the technique though because it sounds too simple :)
 

Another God

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Originally posted by Monique

There must be some catches to the technique though because it sounds too simple :)
I am pretty sure that this doesn't work in every eukaryote. I know it was discovered in some flower, and they find it works in most plants I think.

Apparently it is an 'old' virus protection thing, and so many higher eukaryotes don't have the dsRNA protection system.
 

Monique

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Well, at least I know it works in C. elegans. It is true, I also heard it is an old mechanism.
 

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